Classes

Credits

"Queer and Now"

3

This introductory queer studies course explores multiple ways of defining the broad term "queer" and the sexual and cultural practices that exceed what is often called "normal." As the LGBTQ acronym continues to expand (+IAP, etc.), we will ask, how and why did human sexuality become an object of study? And why do we frequently use theoretical language to talk about sexuality and gender? To address these questions, we will examine a cross-section of the many academic discourses-spanning the fields of history, critical theory, psychology and psychoanalysis, critical ethnic studies, literary and cultural studies, sociology, and sexology-that have enabled the formation of queer studies as an area of inquiry. At the same time, we will explore queer studies' roots in street protest, desire and "experience," and popular representation. Necessarily, our approach to the field will be intersectional and transdisciplinary: we will take for granted the idea that sexuality and gender cannot be discussed apart from race, class, nationality, religious ideology, and other identifications. The course thus offers a constellated history, i.e. one that is not always linear, in an effort to illuminate the various attempts that have been made to capture and classify the queer experience globally, as well as in the Western contexts with which many of us are so familiar.

Course number: HSOC-213
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

(Un) Common Sense

3

Sound. Sight. Touch. Smell. Taste. These are the means we use to perceive and understand our world. How can we push the limits of our senses to gain knowledge and advance ourselves as human beings? What other modes of perception are out there? As humans, the amount of information we can take in with our physiological sensors (our eyes, ears, nose, tongue, and skin) is relatively limited. For example, dogs can travel through time with their nose, using smell to pick up past information and predict disease long before we can. Bats can use sound as sight by echolocation. Dragonflies can see perfectly in low light and over 5 times as fast. Advances in science and technology have allowed us to move well beyond our bodily limitations to gain a greater understanding of the material world from the atomic scale to the universal scale. How do these sense mechanisms work? What perceptual devices have we come up with to push each of these senses to their limits? How does this knowledge transform human progress? Can we gain a higher state of consciousness? What happens when our senses get mixed up? How do we make up for an absence of sense? This class will use lectures, discussion, and hands-on experimental work to develop a holistic scientific understanding of how the senses work and advanced sensing technology (i.e. microscopes, transducers, etc) with no need for prior high-level scientific knowledge or mathematics.

Course number: HSCI-224
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

A Secret Hist of Type & Letter

3

Do the homemade signs stapled to telephone poles qualify as graphic design? Do cut-and-paste ransom notes qualify as typography? Why should graphic designers study hand-painted lettering? This 6-week intensive course will challenge students to critically analyze works not typically explored in graphic design history. The course will consist of two primary components: 1) Historical analysis of vernacular typography and lettering across the globe, and 2) primary research on vernacular typography and lettering in Los Angeles. Multiple class meetings will consist of instructor-led visits to off-campus sites, including various Los Angeles neighborhoods, museums/galleries, archives, and other relevant locations. Assignments include one short midterm paper and a final research report and presentation.

Course number: HHIS-241
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

A Secret Hist of Type & Letter

3

Do the homemade signs stapled to telephone poles qualify as graphic design? Do cut-and-paste ransom notes qualify as typography? Why should graphic designers study hand-painted lettering? This 6-week intensive course will challenge students to critically analyze works not typically explored in graphic design history. The course will consist of two primary components: 1) Historical analysis of vernacular typography and lettering across the globe, and 2) primary research on vernacular typography and lettering in Los Angeles. Multiple class meetings will consist of instructor-led visits to off-campus sites, including various Los Angeles neighborhoods, museums/galleries, archives, and other relevant locations. Assignments include one short midterm paper and a final research report and presentation.

Course number: HSOC-241
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

ARH:

Each section will have a unique description

Course number: SAP-802
Prerequisite: n/a

Adv Branding Workshop

3

This is an advanced multidisciplinary branding workshop that is student-directed with the support of faculty and other professionals. Each student is expected to propose a brand project to work on during the term. A collaborative project between enrolled students is acceptable, as long as the work is divided equitably among teammates. Each student is responsible for setting individual or team goals and a timeline for the term. The culture of the workshop is studio-critique style. Each student is expected to participate fully in supporting their fellow classmates' goals through contributing to peerto-peer well-considered weekly critiques. The class is divided between critical readings and discussions, relevant brand-related topics and case studies led by individual students, and individual progress presentations and feedback sessions. We will engage with other branding professionals through guest lecturers/critics and workshop visits to local branding studios.

Course number: HSOC-340
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Adv Ent Project Studio

Write, develop, create, and finish a self-directed, entertainment-based project. Graphic novels, sock puppets, CG, and everything or anything in-between. An advanced workshop that offers the structure, support, and rigor it takes to complete an ambitious making/writing project. To earn the three Humanities units for this course, students will: Develop a writing and planning process for large-scale projects; write several times every week; write well-composed texts that 1) meet the drafting markers we collectively establish, 2) observe, employ, and experiment with the conventions of the proposed genre and 3) function within the form and context of the proposed finished work; critically read student and published texts; actively participate in constructive discussion of writing during every class. This is a co-requisite class to TDS Advanced Entertainment Project Studio. Concurrent enrollment requirement for 3 credits studio TDS and 3 credits Humanities/Human credits.

Course number: HNAR-402
Prerequisite: Take TDS-402 Take ILL-253;

Adv Game-Writing Studio

This course explores the connection between narrative and the visual experience in the game design realm. Its goal is to provide students an in-depth framework for how to approach crafting a narrative in this interactive medium, along with an understanding of how game design mechanics are connected with developing player agency, and how visuals support these elements. Additional topics will include how the narrative experience transcends text; sound design; visual themes; animation choices; and core game design decisions. Students will craft five character studies, create copy for marketing a game, generate a character relation chart, write a list of rewards and punishments to motivate players in a game, keep a game diary of their video game experiences throughout the course, and combine these elements into an original full game design document. Students will utilize a combination of hands-on-gameplay, lecture and discussion, in-class exercises, and creative writing workshops to foster a greater understanding of the connection between narrative and visual elements with the process of game development. The students will finish the term with a portfolio of copy that connects the various narrative components of the interactive medium, including all of the elements mentioned above.

Course number: HNAR-371
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Adv Screenwriting Workshop

3

This is an advanced screenwriting workshop that provides students the dedicated time, support from instructor and student and structure needed to move a story from concept to the written script form. Each student is responsible for making consistent progress on a script project they commit to on the first day of class. Preferably, this script project is one that they have begun in HNAR-337 Screenwriting and already is in a solid 3-Act Structure format, with well-developed characters. Additionally, each student is expected to contribute to supporting their fellow classmates' goals through reading and well-considered critique. A collaborative project between enrolled students is also acceptable, as long as the writing is divided equitably among teammates. Pre-req: HNAR-337 Screenwriting, or TDS-319 The Storytelling Project.

Course number: HNAR-437
Prerequisite: Take HNAR-337, Screenwriting, or TDS-319, The Storytelling Project

Adventures With Microcomputers

3

This prototyping-oriented class leads students through numerous open-ended, small-to-mid-scale design briefs in the Raspberry Pi 3 development environment. Students will explore environmentally deployed embedded media, mapping and surveillance techniques, as well as basic interaction strategies as a means to establish computer literacy in an always-connected, internet-of-things context. Simultaneously, students will learn strategies for seeing a project through from ideation to completion. Regular critiques will provide an opportunity for students to share their research and prototypes with their colleagues as well as receive direct feedback from the instructor.

Course number: HSCI-215
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Advertising & Propaganda

3

1) In the course of the term each student will develop his or her definition of propaganda; 2) They will develop a broad familiarity with the techniques of persuasion, ""perception management"" and information manipulation & control and they will become familiar with the variety of ways in which the principles and practices of contemporary advertising and Public Relations intersect and overlap with the practices of propaganda; 3) They will be introduced to the ways in which the imagery of contemporary advertising establishes an environment for the dissemination of propaganda; 4) They will learn something of the ways in which the economics of advertising influences the flow of information and the practices of censorship; 5) They will be introduced to examples of ""Alternative Media,"" and alternative sources of information; and, 6) They will learn the meaning of ""full spectrum"" information.

Course number: HSOC-270
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

American Graffiti

3

This course focuses on student experiences with various forms of street art, exploring the overlaps between them and the professional worlds of art, design, and advertising. It coincides with a large, school-wide exhibition about street art, and the class will visit sites both on and off campus.

Course number: HSOC-251
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

American Politics & Media

3

Is the media liberal? Are all politicians in the pockets of corporations? Is dissent unpatriotic? Is the U.S. a nation to be loved or feared? Is it a democracy? An empire? Both? How are we, as citizens (of any country), to find our way through the rhetoric of the left, the right, the middle? How can we make sense out of the increasing flood of political and cultural information that bursts from our computers, televisions, radios, newspapers, and movies? Whom should we believe? This course seeks to provide the tools to help make sense of it all.

Course number: HSOC-301
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Anatomy & Psych of Perception

3

Visual perception includes both observation and interpretation, and ranges from the mere detection of objects being present in the visual field to the construction of reality and the assessment of meaning. In this course we will study the anatomical structures involved in seeing (the eye and the visual cortex), relating them to both "normal" and dysfunctional seeing, including characteristics of the visual field, the perception of color, brightness, and depth, and the recognition of faces. The psychological processes relevant in visual perception include attention and selection, seeing emotional content, and the relation between seeing and thinking. We will deal with the neurological equivalent of these processes, and study both normal and abnormal perception of the environment and the body. The objective is to gain an understanding of seeing-as-action, as a neuropsychological construction, and to become more aware of the characteristics of the experiential phenomena of seeing.

Course number: HSCI-230
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

App:

Course number: SAP-800
Prerequisite: n/a

App:

Course number: SAP-801
Prerequisite: n/a

App:

Course number: SAP-809
Prerequisite: n/a

Applied Psychology

In this course, students will learn how the study of psychology can provide answers to real world problems.

Course number: HSOC-120
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Art & Practice of Leadership

3

The ability to negotiate, communicate, influence and persuade others to do things is indispensable to everything you will accomplish in your business and personal life. The most effective people are those who can organize the cooperation and assistance of other people to accomplish goals and objectives; this is the definition of Leadership. This course is designed to assist the student in understanding the multiple styles and traits of Leadership. Everyone has different values, opinions, attitudes, beliefs, cultural values, work habits and goals. Fortunately, leaders are made, not born. You will learn Leadership, by studying what other excellent leaders have done before. Students will be divided in teams and each team will study various greatest contemporary leaders to learn their Leadership styles and traits. This course is designed to give you the critical tools you will need to run a great Design company.

Course number: HPRO-330
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Art & Science Collaborations

Art, Tech and Science have long been in collaboration, engaged in epic challenges to push the boundaries of truth and understanding about ourselves and our world. From Leonardo Da Vinci and Buckminster Fuller to David Hockney and Stelarc, history has often recognized the lone researcher / inventor who diverges from the tradition and the norm, yet only today do we learn of the collaborative team effort necessary to discover and invent new materials, products, new technologies and worlds. With the advent of the digital age, 3-d printing, wearable tech and VR science, collaborative partnerships are forming daily between artists, designers, technologists and scientists, changing health, education, lifestyle and entertainment as we know it. In this course, we will explore ground - breaking designs, discover the history behind unique materials and prototype products, resulting from art, tech and science research. We will lead our conversation from joint histories, theories and conferences of art, design, tech and science. We will examine differences in methods and funding, yet focus deep attention on the ideas and inventions produced by 20th and 21st century arts, tech and science collaborations from Tatlin's constructivist tower and Bloom the computational game to Muse Headsets for wearable tech. Special attention will be paid to light and space inventions that have profoundly influenced the making of art and science research.

Course number: HCRT-210
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Art of Research (ADT,GPK)

3

Increasingly, designers use research as a critical component of the design process to establish a strong problem foundation, to discover fresh, uncharted opportunities, and to test their design hypotheses. This course provides you with a toolbox of techniques and methods for design-centric research as an integral component of the design process that can be used throughout your career. Beginning with a short survey of how research has been used historically, the course quickly moves to hands-on projects that explore a variety of research methods and processes: from media surveys to interview techniques and the ethical considerations required with their use. The research methods explored in this class expose students to both non-discipline-specific and discipline-specific techniques, balancing the research process between form-making, community insight, and critical reflection.

Course number: HSOC-100
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Art of Research (FAR/ILLU)

3

As fine artists, we know that concepts, materials, and processes combine to make a work, but how can we nurture our innate curiosity to feed our work more deeply? Get brave with research! In this class we empower your creative process to reach heightened levels of curiosity leading to a richer artistic vision. We will map research strategies to find undiscovered inspiration within areas you are already passionate about. You will chart discoveries and deal with inevitable failures as you expand your process of inquiry to make new work. Faculty will bring unique insights from social science research and visual art practice to help you embrace brave choices in unknown territory. We will study artists' research processes in a variety of areas and mediums and use scientific inquiry, literature, social science methodologies, photography, prototyping, and material applications to explore new avenues in your practice. This class is a 3-hour project-based seminar with weekly assignments including writing, artwork, audio-visual presentations, and field trips.

Course number: HSOC-102
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Art of Research (ID Majors)

3

This course will introduce students to the practice of Design Research with a focus on the history, methodologies, methods, and tools utilized in professional practice. We will examine how research can provide a compelling logic for design, and employ a range of research activities including ethnographic interviews, observations, and generative approaches. Students will learn how to plan and conduct an original design research project, analyze the information gathered, and articulate opportunities for creative projects. The ethical considerations of social research practice will be emphasized and examined through texts and student experiences. Working in small groups, students will participate in reflective, inquiry-based critique models contributing to a collaborative, iterative educational environment. Students will communicate what they learn through weekly presentations, reflective writing, and a final presentation. The final creative brief will communicate the research process, key insights and opportunities, recommendations for design, and speculative visualizations or prototypes.

Course number: HSOC-101
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Art of Research Requirement

Psuedo course block

Course number: HSOC-100.PC
Prerequisite: Take HSOC-100 or HSOC-101

Art of Thinking: Philosophy

3

This class grapples with the hardest and deepest of all questions: Is life a matter of fate? Is knowledge power? Is there a soul? Is existence absurd? Is beauty in the eye of the beholder? Does morality even exist? We will read selections from historical philosophical texts and address intellectual watersheds that haunt the modern mind, from "Plato's Cave" in ancient Greece to Michel Foucault's "Madness and Civilization." Above all, we will learn an Art of Thinking, in which there are no answers, but there aremoments of insight and clarity. Students will be expected to read difficult material, write opinionated papers, and contemplate ideas that can profoundly alter our lives.

Course number: HCRT-300
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Artica Project

Development of ideas and concepts will inspire production design of a feature in 2016. Students will have an opportunity to explore futuristic ideas in UI design for AI units, gear for extreme environments, vehicles and products and modular temporary structures. The goal for this special project is to bring together multiple disciplines in a highly collaborative effort to design a trans-media, multifaceted project. One of the focuses will be to analyze how artificial intelligence will be looking at the world from its perspective. Another focus will be viable intelligent design of apparel, gear, vehicles and architecture in an extreme environment.

Course number: TDS-375
Prerequisite: n/a

Asia in the Imagination

Through examining representations of Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans in visual media (film, fashion, art, and advertising), this course will explore constructions of race and gender as seen through Western eyes--which were stereotyped and racist during the 19th and early 20th century--and how and why that changed in the latter part of the 20th century.

Course number: HCRT-301
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Automotive Engineering

3

This course covers the principles of engineering that guide the development of automobile design and manufacture, including automobile functionality and an overview of the demands placed on the design process.

Course number: HSCI-200
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Avant-Garde Film

In one course it is not possible to show the entirety of avant-garde film history, but only a slender chunk of it, like a core sample taken from a tree commonly thought to be dead. Unfortunately, history (in the guise of the market economy's triumph) has not been very kind to the avant-garde canon: films have fallen out of distribution; texts have gone out of print; whole careers have disappeared. In spite of these depredations, idealists still believe that alternative film practices have not yet exhausted themselves. Avant-Garde Film's screenings and readings may even suggest possible strategies for an independent cinema that conceives of itself as more than just a fawning poor relation of Hollywood.

Course number: HNAR-331
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Avant-Garde Film 2

Avant-Garde Film 2 continues the film screenings and readings of Avant-Garde Film 1, however the first is not a prerequisite for this course. In one course it is not possible to show the entirety of avant-garde film history, but only a slender chunk of it, like a core sample taken from a tree commonly thought to be dead. Unfortunately, history (in the guise of the market economy's triumph) has not been very kind to the avant-garde canon: films have fallen out of distribution; texts have gone out of print; whole careers have disappeared. In spite of these depredations, idealists still believe that alternative film practices have not yet exhausted themselves. Avant-Garde Film's screenings and readings may even suggest possible strategies for an independent cinema that conceives of itself as more than just a fawning poor relation of Hollywood. Attendance is particularly important in this class, as many of the films are not available on DVD.

Course number: HNAR-335
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Bauhaus: School of Creativity

This course is a case study of one school, which is still emblematic for a new approach to the concepts of art, design, and technologies. Since the Bauhaus was the center of new ideas and practices in teaching, architecture, design, and the social position of the visual arts, studying its detailed history leads students to the critical understanding of the current position of these issues. The Bauhaus's historical role reveals the exposure of art and design to the politics within and without the walls of the school. A survey of the New Bauhaus in Chicago illuminates the particular American aspects of the Bauhaus, and its afterlife in the U.S.

Course number: HHIS-294
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Bioissues

Biology is promised to be the technology of the 21st century, where breakthroughs in science and engineering will offer longer, healthier lives and cleaner, more sustainable technologies. This course focuses on the history and potential futures of biomedicine and biotechnology, with particular emphasis on the social and political contexts of the science. Case studies will explore topics in evolution and ecology, microscopy and cellular imaging, DNA sequencing and genomics, sex, gender, and reproduction, genetic engineering and agriculture, tissue engineering, and neuroscience. Course material will span from reading of scientific texts to analysis of work by bioartists critically engaging with the contemporary biosciences. The course is intended as a broad introduction to issues in biology and bioart; previous coursework in biology is not required.

Course number: HSCI-223
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Brains, Minds, and Society

Cal Tech course via exchange program

Course number: CAL-102A
Prerequisite: n/a

Branding Strategies

3

The purpose of this class is to gain a more thoughtful and critical understanding of a brand, its history, current trends, social and ethical implications, and cultural context, as well as the brand's relationship to our individual and generational identity. We will explore sustainability and its impact on brand value, and what it means to create truly responsible design. Students will conduct and evaluate various forms of research and develop brand platforms and creative briefs to inform and inspire innovative solutions within their current design projects. Through class discussions of design thinking, critiques of design work, guest speakers, presentation and analysis of case studies, and development of branding strategies and strategy diagrams, we will examine how a brand is defined and translated through environmental design, product, graphics, advertising, and communications. We will work in multidisciplinary teams in a design charette format to created branded projects to directly implement what we have learned over the term.

Course number: HSOC-210
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Brandmatters

3

The objective of this class is to gain a more thoughtful and critical understanding of a brand, its current trends, social and ethical implications, cultural context, as well as the brand's relationship to our individual and generational identity. We will explore what it means to create purpose-driven brands, grounded in values, culture, and authenticity that connect and create meaning. Students will uncover key insights from various forms of research and analysis to develop brand platforms that will inform and inspire innovative design solutions. Through class discussions, studio visits, field trips and case studies, we will examine how a brand is defined and translated through its various touchpoints. We will work in interdisciplinary teams to develop creative briefs and branding strategies to re-position a brand and communicate compelling and relevant stories using the tools that we have learned over the term.

Course number: HSOC-212
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Broken Music

Broken Music is a seminar class about the history and practice of sound in the arts beginning in the early 20th century, through post war, and up to the present. We will look at and listen to the sonic Avant-Garde of Europe, experimental sound practices in the United States, in other parts of the world, and alternative histories and practitioners will also be presented. This seminar is particularly interested in the multiplicity of sound in contemporary art practice and how that can be connected to other known art movements and genres of fine art. The history, technological advancements, current discourses, and contemporary practices will be presented as they are related to the sonic fine arts. Readings, reading responses, class discussions and presentations will comprise the class time. A selection of texts that situate and theorize sound in relation to art practice will be provided for reading and class discussion.

Course number: HHIS-276
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Bsnss&Prof Prac Trnsfr Credit

Course number: HBPP-TRNSFR
Prerequisite: n/a

Bus Affairs for Filmmakers

3

This class offers an insider's view of the business side of film and television development and production, from the acquisition of rights and the negotiation of agreements for writers, producers, directors, and actors, through the many avenues of distribution, including consideration of ancillary markets and so-called new media. Several class meetings will feature guest speakers, including top industry professionals such as studio executives, directors, producers, agents, etc. This class is open to all majors.

Course number: HPRO-230
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Business & Professnl Practice

3

This class will examine business and professional practices that help form the basis of a career in photography. The goal is to begin to create a practical business framework for aesthetic and commercial growth in a changing media landscape.

Course number: HBUS-201
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Business 101

3

Building a successful career requires not just talent, but an understanding of what it takes to be in business. Business 101 is an introduction to the business side of creative practice. The course is divided into two parts: general business information, including starting up, intellectual property, and money; followed by topics specifically geared towards the illustration, photography, or design business, including marketing and self-promotion, pricing and estimating, contracts, and client relationships.

Course number: HBUS-101
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Business of Design

3

The skills learned throughout your education at Art Center are invaluable for acquiring a position in the field of product design. But in this extremely competitive field, skills alone will not ensure a successful career. Individuals who excel, whether as entrepreneurs, corporate designers, or consultant designers, have embraced and exploited their role in the bigger universe of industry. Designers who understand business, corporate disciplines and systems, and how design can strategically contribute to business objectives and goals enjoy rapid advancement and a higher level of career success.

Course number: HBUS-300
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Calculus of One & Sevrl Var

Cal Tech course via exchange program

Course number: CAL-001A
Prerequisite: n/a

Campaign Cinema

3

Campaign Cinema: Politics in American Cinema This course is a review of American dominant films that venture into the themes and visual essaying of American politics and their rituals. The focus on American presidential campaigns is themed since early American film history. The course will outline chronologically that narrative interest and examine films that contemplate subjects of presidential campaign stagecrafting, attempting to connect voter participation, yet often far off from the actual assemblies of administrative and legislative processes. Also to be considered, journalism, a prominent intersecting topic of this film history, as they are the purveyors and tattlers of campaign stagecrafting. What are party platforms and how are they staged in speechwriting and how are they made actual in legislation are grounds for this examination to help the student realize and progress their individual citizenship. Democracy and its configurations will be examined as we parallel consider this history of film and its political propositions. The course will also review and discuss political ads, current and from the past as well as cinematic structures will be examined and critiqued.

Course number: HNAR-360
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Ceramics

3

Cal Tech course via exchange program

Course number: CAL-063A
Prerequisite: n/a

Children's Literature

3

This course has you consider children's literature and asks you to write fiction or non-fiction for children. You need not be a writer to take this course--you learn by doing. We will read and analyze stories for children, ranging from myths to modern works, from young children to young adults. We will examine narrative structure and some of the basic requirements for writing books for publication. You should leave the course with a better understanding of the role literature for children plays in their lives, and how to create it.

Course number: HNAR-310
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Cinema Against the Grain

American commercial films have been the subject of sustained commentary and debate for nearly as long as they have been produced. Their work on spectators in society is understood rather well by marketing executives, by intellectuals, and indeed by many "average" consumers, if the relentless self-reference of contemporary movies can be accepted as proof. The latest blockbuster -- soon to be commonly acknowledged classics -- address us as though they are the only satisfactory alternative. They (and their flacks) suggest that it would be perverse to want anything more from a movie. And yet, some people go looking elsewhere for film history. There is no unifying theory of works that offer resistance to the dominant model. A number of disparate tendencies and histories must be taken into account. This course takes up a discussion of a few of them in an attempt to suggest possible strategies for those still interested in pursuing a contestatory film practice.

Course number: HNAR-351
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Co-Lab

Co-Lab is a course that explores the myriad forms of creative collaboration in Art and Design, and across disciplines. Students will be working collaboratively to produce ambitious and experimental works. Attend with the expectation of being surprised. The nature of collaborations is open, and projects will meld personalities and styles in ways that cant be predicted. If you have been wanting to collaborate with a classmate, this is your chanceenroll together! If you are interested in collaboration but dont have a partner in mind, that is fine too, partnerships and group collaborations will develop naturally out of the assignments.

Course number: TDS-336
Prerequisite: n/a

Collaborate Leadership

Your ability to thrive in an increasing interconnected world is vital to having a successful career. Leadership in a creative context means being able to direct, influence and persuade people of all kinds. Being powerful and effective requires an understanding of when to take charge and when to join forces to work as a team. Collaborative leadership is about working together to achieve goals. This course will explore leadership styles and decision-making; the impact of culture, gender and heritage on leadership; communication and risk taking; motivating and negotiating with people; and team dynamics. You will learn leadership skills via experiential exercises within ever evolving group scenarios throughout the term. Guest speakers and a range of readings on leadership theory will demonstrate a variety of approaches to the concept of modern collaborative leadership.

Course number: HPRO-331
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Combined Trajectories

This course reflects on collaboration as a way of understanding creative practices and, more broadly, as a fundamental human experience. Despite the apparent undermining of the individual genius by the advent of postmodern thought, creative practice is still predominantly an individual enterprise. However, the last few years have witnessed a significant change in the conditions that privilege individual creation: economic crisis and social movements have emerged in every continent, creating spaces that stimulate values of collaboration, alternative economies and social engagement. We will explore recent social and artistic accounts of collectivism by artists, philosophers, sociologists and writers, and revise current examples of collective artistic endeavors. Students will creatively engage in collaboration exercises and present the readings to the class by means of lectures, performance, and/or other resources and artifacts related to their professional practices.

Course number: HCRT-215
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Cont. Chinese & Japanese Art

3

This course surveys the remarkable development of contemporary art in two powerhouse Asian countries, China and Japan. Japanese artists emerged into contemporary modes shortly after World War II, partly as protest against the war, while it took the death of Mao Zedong in 1976 to free Chinese artists to do so. While tracing historical and cultural roots, we will study the work and careers of individual artists who have made an international impact -- artists such as Ai Weiwei and Cai Guoqiang for China, and Yayoi Kusama, Takashi Murakami, Yoshitomo Nara, and Mariko Mori for Japan.

Course number: HCRT-305
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Contemp. Practice & Politics

This course will focus on the indelible significance of politics in art. One of the regions where the interrelationship of art and politics has been clear throughout history is Eastern Europe, known for its historical and cultural complexities. For students who are interested in a multi-layered cultural landscape, which, although it appears to be far away, is in many ways close to home, this course will offer rich information and insight into the political and cultural contexts that inform and shape art, design, architecture, and the art discourse. The postwar and contemporary arts of Central and Eastern Europe will be examined as a case study that leads to the understanding of the institutional structure of the art scene in our world.

Course number: HHIS-225
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Contemporary Art History

This post-1960 Art History class intends to introduce key historical artistic movements, by providing contextual (social, political, cultural) landmarks, and by highlighting some major artists' figures (from Hans Haacke, to Sturtevant, to DIS Magazine.), to underline the ruptures and continuity of art history.All together, a constant focus on practices challenging traditional artistic classifications and borders--through appropriation, sound, craft or queer problematics--will be explored in a variety of manners. Through a wide range of visual material (photos and videos of artists' works, exhibitions views), along with theoretical material (artists' statements, catalogues' essays, and press responses), each class aims to give a broad understanding of the artworks 'intents and receptions, offering a good overview of high and popular culture at large.

Course number: HHIS-226
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Contemporary Chinese Art

This course traces the emergence of China as a contemporary society through its visual culture. After World War II the country was dominated by a Socialist Realist aesthetic in art, film, and design for publications and posters. During the era of "reform and openness" in the 1980s, artists and students were finally allowed to see what the rest of the world was doing, and launched their own experiments in art-making--even inventing a movement called Political Pop, which caught the attention of curators and collectors in the West. Topics to be covered include the dominance and subversion of the written language, the re-use of folk imagery, and the tradition of disguised protest in art.

Course number: HCRT-330
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Contemporary Chinese Cinema

3

One of the most exciting cinema cultures to emerge in recent decades is that of Mainland Chinese cinema. Mired in propaganda for the first three decades after the Communist revolution (1949), Chinese cinema finally found its authentic voice with the Fifth Generation, which emerged in the 1980s. These talented and ambitious filmmakers were graduates of the Beijing Film Academy, which had been shut down during the disastrous Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), and they were eager to tell stories truthful to the modern Chinese experience --- while eloquently using cinema language. The films they made --- such as "Yellow Earth," "Raise the Red Lantern," and "Blue Kite" --- were often banned at home but found audiences abroad through international film festivals, and the directors were lauded as auteurs. Today, Chen Kaige and Zhang Yimou are internationally recognized, and a younger generation steps in to try to capture China in transition. This course will start with examples from the silent era (1930s) and Communist propaganda films (early 1970s), then quickly move into the films that became international sensations. Also covered will be the art films of Yang Fudong and Jia Zhangke.

Course number: HCRT-302
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Contemporary Place-Making

3

What defines a place, and how have our notions of place changed and evolved during the modern and postmodern eras? In this course, we'll examine the cultural, social, political, and economic forces at play in the design of spatial experiences. Beginning with industrialism and the start of the modern age, we'll explore how ideas about the nature of everyday life begin to change paradigms of thought in art, politics, and philosophy; eventually altering both the practice and products of design. Following this thread through to postmodernism, we will examine the ways these shifting ideas continue to develop, and manifest in contemporary design work, paying particular attention to the design elements of place; including: commercial, domestic, civic and recreational spaces. Design as a cultural product, will serve as a framework to investigate and discuss the evolution of place in multiple contexts as experienced by many users. In addition to design examples, we will look at precedents in art, architecture, film and literature. Readings will consist of key theoretical texts of the period. As we unpack the meanings of place, we will develop a critical lens through which we can better analyze and apply to our own work.

Course number: HHIS-393
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Conversational Japanese(TAMA)

This is an introductory conversational Japanese course designed to help students prepare for their study abroad experience in Japan. In this course you'll learn useful conversational phrases and vocabulary words for everyday life situations such as introducing yourself, traveling, shopping, and eating out. An overview of the Japanese writing systems will also prepare you to read basic signs and menus. You'll also gain a cultural understanding and acquire basic conversational skills through interactive exercises, dialogues and field trips. This course is restricted to students selected for the TAMA Study Abroad Program in Japan.

Course number: HHUM-101
Prerequisite: n/a

Creating Social Impact

This course is designed to provide students with both the historical context and foundational research skills they need to create art, design, and media for both local and global social innovation. During the first half of the term we will analyze social documentary photography, human-centered design, museum exhibitions, films, urban planning, and architecture to help students establish a framework for understanding creative interventions into international development and social advocacy. Building on this context, each student will conduct an independent research project that investigates a topic or opportunity within the field of social impact. Students will create images, objects, and writing as part of an integrated research practice, and revise these materials in ways appropriate to the practices of art and design; they will also practice design research and introductory ethnographic field methods in order to gain fresh insight on their chosen topics. Students will be challenged to think critically about the cultural, political, and economic effects of art and design interventions. Final projects will consist of a presentation and a short paper detailing each student's research experiences and reflections.

Course number: HSOC-206
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Creative Collaboration

This course is designed to focus on collaborating in teams. Stimulating and facilitating creative thinking enables diverse groups to generate innovative ideas that impact business. Creative collaboration is about being able to direct, influence and persuade people of all kinds. The fundamental skills and best practices of successful group dynamics in situational leadership, effective communication, flexible delegation, negotiation, planning and addressing meaningful problems will be explored. Through experiential exercises within ever evolving group scenarios, you will increase your capacity and become confident in your ability to thrive in a variety of collaborative environments. The experimental structure of the course creates an opportunity for you to exercise your imagination and take ownership of the collective learning process. In addition, several team projects and a range of theoretical readings will demonstrate a variety of interesting approaches to creative collaboration.

Course number: HPRO-332
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Creative Pres. & Critiques

3

The goal of the course is to provide an understanding of the structure, relevance, delivery and preparation needed for persuasive and compelling presentations and critiques. This course can raise awareness of what professionals do to develop and sell their ideas. Presenting well is a requirement for the development of the designer's voice and the work itself. This course gives a designer, solo or in a team, what they need to be able to craft effective presentations to large and small audiences, in virtual or physical spaces. Critiquing methods will be reviewed and practiced to enable students to effectively give and receive input on their ideas and the ideas from their teams.

Course number: HPRO-201
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Creativity Workshop

0

No need to enroll/no credit. Open to all Art Center students (undergraduate and graduate), this workshop consists of one-on-one meetings with the creativity coach at times to be arranged. The focus is on releasing your untapped creative energies to make your work more alive, dynamic, original, and truly fulfilling. Creativity-enhancing processes are easily customized for your specific needs and goals. It's simple, fun, and free, and produces dramatic, immediate results for projects/assignments in all design disciplines.

Course number: HHUM-001
Prerequisite: n/a

Critical Ends: Films by Women

3

This class is a study of films and videos made by artists who have a unique approach to process and to relationships between form and content. We will look at works by women from around the world in the fields of Experimental Film, Video Art, Independent film and internet based projects, among other practices. Some examples include the films of Akosua Adoma Owusu, Cheryl Dunye, Peggy Ahwesh, Ana Mendieta, Shambhavi Kaul, Yvonne Rainer and Sophie Calle. Rather than looking at the films through established theoretical frameworks of film or women's studies, we will be engaging a more open approach by which we allow the frameworks to emerge from the works themselves. Our involvement with this experimental pedagogy includes reading and discussing primary source materials (artist writings) and other theoretical texts and keeping written entries for every artist and every film. We will ask ourselves questions such as ..what is the role of influence and lineage in these works? How are notions of collaboration conceived and enacted? How does the presence of personal material interact with other types of subject matter? Part of the objective of this class is to expose you to a greater number of works by women than you would otherwise see. There'll be visiting artists and field trips around town. This class is open to everyone.

Course number: HNAR-352
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Critical Practice 1

3

This course will provide a basic visual vocabulary or rhetoric. The primary learning objective is to understand how images work--successfully or not--to convey the intended meaning of the artist/designer to a desired audience. Rather than ask what images mean, the emphasis is on how they work in a variety of contexts. In other words, students will learn the rhetoric of visual communication, with "rhetoric" understood here as a form of persuasion that produces an intellectual and physical transformation in the viewer.

Course number: HCRT-100
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Cultural Anthropology

Cultural anthropology shows the organic design of culture in general, emphasizing the similarities and differences between cultures in the world. By the end of the course the student should understand the basic institutions of all cultures as well as be able to discuss the traits, rituals, and lifeways of several specific cultures. We will answer the following questions: Why do people in different parts of the world act so strangely and why should design and art students care? How do anthropologists discover the design of culture? Why do mothers in the Beng culture give their babies chili pepper enemas? Why do you speak with an accent when you learn a second language? When is your wife's mother also your father's sister? Why is Indian food served on metal trays? and many others.

Course number: HSOC-112
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

DM: Safe Water Chile

Designing real world solutions to empower Chile's poorest families, in partnership with the humanitarian organization Un Techo Para Chile. Students will travel to Santiago, Chile over summer break for two weeks of intensive field research. The studio will focus on products and environmental interventions to help slum-dwellers transport, store, efficiently use, conserve and re-use water in their daily lives. Student innovators will design and fabricate extremely low-cost, ingenious prototypes that have the potential for real world implementation. This project affords students the unique challenge to design interventions which act locally to create life-changing opportunities and break cycles of poverty that have endured for hundreds of years. Host department: Environmental Design. Faculty: Dan Gottlieb, Penny Herscovitch (Environmental)

Course number: TDS-308
Prerequisite: n/a

Des Hist of Comics & Animation

3

History of Comics & Animation provides in-depth critical studies of illustrated sequential narrative, both print and motion, with emphasis on creative visualization. Its goal is to expand, enhance, and enrich graphic communication skills. To that end, it encompasses pictorial media from single image to multi-panel cartoons, comic strips to comic books and graphic novels, and flip-books to animated film and video. It explores landmark theories, moments, and movements of significant innovation and transformation from a diversity of perspectives. It investigates the form and content of comics and animation within broader artistic, social, political, economic, and technological contexts, and covers a variety of eras, cultures, and issues. Learning methods: audio-visual presentations, opinionated classroom discussions, take-home exams, guest speakers, and other strategies.

Course number: HHIS-256
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Design 2 - Computer Lab

0

This lab is an introduction to the Processing language for Graphics and Interaction Design students taking Design-2. The class will focus on beginning programming, basic concepts of algorithmic design, and developing one Processing-based project for the Design-2 midterm presentations.

Course number: INT-152L
Prerequisite: INT-152 Design 2

Design 2 - Materials Lab

This seven week lab attached to Design 2, beginning week 3, will instruct students in the safe operation of all the equipment students need to learn to have access to the shop, including the table saw, the band saw, and the lathe among others. Students will receive a shop access pass after completion of this lab. In addition, student will get support in the construction of their final 3-D projects required for Design 2.

Course number: INT-152M
Prerequisite: Take INT-152

Design Ethnography

Students in this course will explore ethnographic research methods for understanding people and how they live their lives as a way of gaining insights on what matters most in design. Ethnography, which emerges from the discipline of anthropology, offers a systematic research method for digging into people's core values and beliefs, feelings and attitudes, needs and aspirations, and uncovering the hidden meanings of social life. This knowledge allows designers to be responsive to the emerging needs of their audience and able to generate design solutions that are meaningful and impactful. Students will be introduced to the practices of ethnographic research and the theories underpinning them by collecting data and building a data portfolio. The data will be used for coding, analysis, and interpretation and lead to a final design proposal. Course readings from within the social sciences will shed light on research methodologies either by speaking directly to the research process or by providing a model example of ethnographic research.

Course number: HSOC-230
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Design for Sustainability

3

"Design" is being redefined, and designers must now use their unlimited ingenuity to consider the environmental consequences of materials, production methods, performance, and life cycling. Students learn the fundamental principles of the science of ecology, study methods for evaluating environmental performance of design/product concepts, and learn current strategies for creating a sustainable interface between design and the environment.

Course number: HSCI-251
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Designing Social Enterprise

3

A social enterprise can be defined as a business (for-profit or non-profit) that dedicates the majority of its focus toward solving a social or environmental problem. In this hands-on course, students will engage with a suite of design strategy tools that will allow them to invent their own social enterprise and/or consult organizations on the development of new products and services that can benefit humanity. The course is a deep primer on the establishment and management of social enterprises, covering topics including the mechanics of social enterprise, business model design, service/product design for social impact, community engagement, and close examinations of various examples. Through the course, students will research the history of prominent business models in the impact space (sharing economy, one-for-one, give-half, micro-lending, etc.), create an intervention and prototype that tests a new model of impact, and design a unique business plan and pitch that will enable the long-term vision for their own enterprise to flourish. The course will also include guest speakers and critics from the social enterprise field, and students will gain context and awareness around the discipline of social entrepreneurship as well as a series of key methodologies that will allow them to be prepared to design a unique social enterprise including: Trends Analysis, Design Futures, Product Development, Service Design, Business Modeling, Public Speaking.

Course number: HENT-212
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Detention Hall: Philosophy Lab

3

School's out, but not for everyone! You've got detention ... In this unique humanities offering, you'll collaborate with other misfits and be encouraged to combine philosophical thinking with studio practice. You'll be introduced to some great and powerful philosophers whose ideas remain a mother lode for designers, artists, and filmmakers. Together, we'll explore issues in sense perception, communication, the beautiful, the sublime, and the intricate nature of human belief and desire. We might even squeeze in a field trip. No philosophical background is required or expected: just an eagerness to understand yourself and the world.

Course number: HCRT-303
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Digital Humanities

Libraries, archives, museums, the great repositories of the human past, make available sources that have enhanced how we learn subjects and make things. The vast digital collections on the Web have transformed the way we study the past achievements of humans, whether history, literature, philosophy, music, or art. This is a practice-based humanities course with a research and design component. Students work individually or collaboratively on projects such as history websites, video essays, set designs or promotional materials for plays or operas.

Course number: HSOC-296
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Digital Humanities

Libraries, archives, museums, the great repositories of the human past, make available sources that have enhanced how we learn subjects and make things. The vast digital collections on the Web have transformed the way we study the past achievements of humans, whether history, literature, philosophy, music, or art. This is a practice-based humanities course with a research and design component. Students work individually or collaboratively on projects such as history websites, video essays, set designs or promotional materials for plays or operas.

Course number: HHIS-296
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Digital Humanities

Libraries, archives, museums, the great repositories of the human past, make available sources that have enhanced how we learn subjects and make things. The vast digital collections on the Web have transformed the way we study the past achievements of humans, whether history, literature, philosophy, music, or art. In this course, students will learn the basic skills of researching a digital humanities project. These projects may include history exhibits; documentary videos; scenic designs for a play or opera; maps or models of fictional worlds. Students can choose to work individually, or collaboratively on small project teams.

Course number: HCRT-266
Prerequisite: Take HHIS-110, Intro to Modernism

Digital Humanities

Libraries, archives, museums, the great repositories of the human past, make available sources that have enhanced how we learn subjects and make things. The vast digital collections on the Web have transformed the way we study the past achievements of humans, whether history, literature, philosophy, music, or art. In this course, students will learn the basic skills of researching a digital humanities project. These projects may include history exhibits; documentary videos; scenic designs for a play or opera; maps or models of fictional worlds. Students can choose to work individually, or collaboratively on small project teams.

Course number: HSOC-266
Prerequisite: Take HHIS-110, Intro to Modernism

Documentary Film

Documentary Film is a survey of non-fiction films, most from this century, but all reflecting on concerns left over from the previous one. The topics addressed include the way people work, resist oppression, and invent culture; and, most importantly, how they have persistently envisioned utopia, often with results at variance with their intentions. Spectators and critics have at times declared the practice of making documentaries perverse or meaningless, yet these films continue to have popular appeal; indeed, the public's appetite for them only seems to grow as the notion of non-fiction itself threatens to be evacuated by advances in computer graphics, public relations, and cosmetic surgery. The genre has attracted filmmakers interested in everything from exploitation to edification; what their works have in common is a relationship to life as it is lived. Students curious about how our society came to be how it is today will find some answers in recent documentary films.

Course number: HNAR-344
Prerequisite: Take HMN-100 Writing Studio, HMN-101 Writing Studio Intensive or Passed Writing Prof Test

Dreams, Myths & Fantasies

How do we get ideas? Where do they come from? Are they just luck or can we find a path that leads us reliably towards them? It is "the deep imagination" that is the source of inexhaustible inspiration. As artists we need to understand what it is and how to establish a relationship with it. This class, in conjunctions with TDS-358, aims to further that life long journey to inspiration and personal growth as an artist. Combining the insights of modern psychology and creative techniques, this course proposes to deepen our understanding of the symbolic dimension of image making. By exploring our dreams, fantasies, and other products of our unconscious we will reveal the relevance of the world's mythologies to our personal lives and work, and how as artists we impact the community. A team of faculty members from different disciplines: illustration, psychology, literature, and theater, along with guest faculty will lead the explorations.

Course number: HSCI-288
Prerequisite: Take TDS-358 Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Dsg Hist of Cartoons & Comics

In-depth studies of the cartoon medium, from newspaper strips to comic books and graphic novels and from editorial and one-panel gag illustrations to animation. Concentration is on transformative moments, movements, and theories in the evolution of both traditional and experimental graphic imagery and storytelling. Form and content is analyzed within the broader artistic, social, political, economic, and technological contexts of many diverse cultures and eras. Format: audiovisual presentations, classroom discussions and assessments, readings, essay projects, and other explorations.

Course number: HHIS-255
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

EL Basic

3

This is a basic college-preparatory writing class for EL students.

Course number: HWRI-040
Prerequisite: n/a

ESL Placement

Course number: HWRI-ESL
Prerequisite: n/a

El Ni?o FX: Water

This course explores our relationship to water, and how access to this vital resource shapes our cities, societies, cultures and imaginations. It is structured as a collaborative workshop combining field work, interdisciplinary research and creative speculation. To ground our inquiry we will tour several hydro-infrastructure sites where local sources of water are controlled and/or where more distant supplies are collected, treated and delivered to our taps. Presentations and background readings will unpack these sites in relation to counter-models and creative expressions drawn from other times, places and cultures, all with an eye toward revealing the embedded assumptions, entrenched interests, social implications and aesthetic dimensions of our current water supply. No prior experience or background is assumed, and all majors are welcome in this multi-disciplinary space: we will learn key analytic concepts from natural history, geography and sociology, and also use lenses from film, science-fiction and environmental literature to imagine alternate ecologies. Participants with prior water-related research interests are invited to use the workshop as a forum for adding depth and complexity to their investigations. Cumulative projects will emphasize independent and/or collaborative research based in student interests. Conjectural propositions and other experimental means of re-imagining linkages between natural history, urban development, and hinterland networks will be encouraged.

Course number: HSOC-272
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

El Ni?o FX: Water

This course explores our relationship to water, and how access to this vital resource shapes our cities, societies, cultures and imaginations. It is structured as a collaborative workshop combining field work, interdisciplinary research and creative speculation. To ground our inquiry we will tour several hydro-infrastructure sites where local sources of water are controlled and/or where more distant supplies are collected, treated and delivered to our taps. Presentations and background readings will unpack these sites in relation to counter-models and creative expressions drawn from other times, places and cultures, all with an eye toward revealing the embedded assumptions, entrenched interests, social implications and aesthetic dimensions of our current water supply. No prior experience or background is assumed, and all majors are welcome in this multi-disciplinary space: we will learn key analytic concepts from natural history, geography and sociology, and also use lenses from film, science-fiction and environmental literature to imagine alternate ecologies. Participants with prior water-related research interests are invited to use the workshop as a forum for adding depth and complexity to their investigations. Cumulative projects will emphasize independent and/or collaborative research based in student interests. Conjectural propositions and other experimental means of re-imagining linkages between natural history, urban development, and hinterland networks will be encouraged.

Course number: HCRT-272
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Electronics Workshop

0

This is a technology-oriented project workshop, specializing in Arduino electronics and programming. It is open to all students who need assistance in constructing a functioning prototype or proof of concept. The main goal is to enable the student to design and assemble their own prototypes in the future. No appointments necessary; walk in basis.

Course number: HHUM-004
Prerequisite: n/a

Elementary French

3

Cal Tech course via exchange program

Course number: CAL-L102
Prerequisite: n/a

Elementary German

Cal Tech course via exchange program

Course number: CAL-130A
Prerequisite: n/a

English Language

3

This is an advanced college-preparatory writing class for EL students.

Course number: HWRI-050
Prerequisite: n/a

English Language Intensive

3

This class will immerse students in spoken and written English communication skills needed for success as a student at ArtCenter. An alignment with design classes taught in tandem promotes student understanding of design vocabulary, presentation skills and the practice of critique. In addition to building confidence and ability, this class will also support preparation for the writing placement test used to place first term students in a writing class for Fall semester.

Course number: HWRI-045
Prerequisite: Must enroll in INT-104, Design 1: LDI

Entrepreneurial Spirit

3

An entrepreneur is a true innovator, someone who recognizes opportunities and organizes the resources needed to take advantage of them. Henry Kaiser, the steel and automotive magnate, said that entrepreneurs "Find a need and fill it." Entrepreneurship is about hard work, reducing risk, and promoting a simple solution. Entrepreneurs have a "prove it" attitude and pursue a complete understanding of how their product works. Entrepreneurs leave nothing to chance.

Course number: HENT-300
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Environmental Issues

This course explores the impact of overpopulation, urbanization, pollution, politics, and environmental activism on the land, oceans, and atmosphere. Such topics as endangered species, biodiversity, overpopulation, animal rights, deforestation, desertification, toxic waste, global warming, ozone depletion, wetlands destruction, oceanic threats, and overgrazing will be covered. Students will be better informed to interpret complex environmental issues and apply them to their work and daily lives. They will be better prepared to have their work, either design or fine art, reflect the urgent nature of global concerns. They will also be introduced to the idea of science as the foundation of the realities facing our world today.

Course number: HSOC-282
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Environmental Issues

3

This course explores the impact of overpopulation, urbanization, pollution, politics, and environmental activism on the land, oceans, and atmosphere. Such topics as endangered species, biodiversity, overpopulation, animal rights, deforestation, desertification, toxic waste, global warming, ozone depletion, wetlands destruction, oceanic threats, and overgrazing will be covered. Students will be better informed to interpret complex environmental issues and apply them to their work and daily lives. They will be better prepared to have their work, either design or fine art, reflect the urgent nature of global concerns. They will also be introduced to the idea of science as the foundation of the realities facing our world today.

Course number: HSCI-221
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Exploring Math+Creativity

3

Exploring the Mathematics and Creativity of Infinity This course will be an informative exploration in higher mathematics and theoretical physics, which allows students to pursue selected topics in advanced mathematics far beyond the normal curriculum under the direction of a supervising instructor. With high school algebra as the only prerequisite, we will study Cantorian infinity, group theory, algebraic and geometric topology, black holes, and finish with string theory and hologram theory, the richest, most exciting current research areas. The class is focused on the intersections of creativity and mathematics; an 'Alice in Mathematics Land' journey. The grading rubric will be a series of reflection papers and one final power point presentation based on a mathematics topic of the student's choosing.

Course number: HSCI-301
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Fanfiction

This class will survey the history and significance of fanfic from the early 1990's to the present. We will examine a range of cultures and practices. Through charting the discourses of pathology and empowerment that circulate around the cultural conception of the "fan," we will consider contemporary debates around fan labor and the commodification of fan culture. In addition to critically analyzing fans' transformative works, students will mobilize course concepts to produce and theorize fan texts of their own.

Course number: HNAR-326
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Fashion Cultures

Fashion is a way of thinking and doing that impacts all aspects of our lives and is an integral part of all areas of design and media. This class explores fashion concepts and the principles of style through three different cultural case studies -- Japanese esthetic philosophies, materials, and social narratives as represented through fashion culture from the history of the kimono and is design influence, to contemporary innovators Issey Miyake, and Eri Matsui and their engagement with technology, mathematics and architecture. Black style and its meanings, impact and influence, cultural esthetics and values, social and political narratives, and fahsion icons from Church women to the Black Panthers, Diana Ross to Michelle Obama. Fashion in entertainment and media culture -- how personal style defines and expresses character and establishes cultural contexts in movies, television, music and dance, and how it influences fashion. Students will participate in research, presentation, and collaborative and individual fashion projects, as well as critique and discussion.

Course number: HSOC-320
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Films Michelangelo Antonioni

A Study of Modernity and Its Discontents. This course is an auteur study in which we consider Antonioni's challenges to traditional approaches to storytelling, cinema, and realism in favor of intellectual contemplation and political thoughtfulness. Starting with his earlier neo-realist films, the course will move throughout his 45-year career to consider his use of action, image, radical narrative, disconnected events, experimental color, and documentary.

Course number: HNAR-338
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Films of Alfred Hitchcock

This course is not a production film class, but a course that composites possibilities of how to view and interpret an Alfred Hitchcock film, (or a film/sign), alongside an immense history of theoretical and critical writings. The course examines authorship, spectatorship, and identity together with other issues of reflexive film, and film's relationship to issues in painting, theatre, architecture, opera, music and sound, and literature. We view and research Hitchcock?s films by the use of multiple lenses including an expressionist's lens, a surrealist lens/or a psychoanalytical lens, a surveillance/voyeur lens, a semiotic lens, supported by readings by Raymond Bellour, Jacques Lacan, Slavoj Zizek, Gilles Delueze, William Rothman, Leland Pougue, Fredric Jameson and others. The course also examines the political and social atmospheres of the times in which the films were made, and identifies the filmographies' affect/effect, its pop cultural manifestation and influence. In connection, the course explores Hitchcock's universal themes, clarifies Hitchcockian space, suspense, objects and the use of the McGuffin, and distinguishes his use of Hamlet persuaded theatre. Starting with the Pleasure Garden in 1927 and ending with Family Plot in 1976, the director made 59 full-length films and scores of television 1/2 hours plots that locate characters in a fear constructed social system.

Course number: HNAR-343
Prerequisite: Take HMN-100 Writing Studio, HMN-101 Writing Studio Intensive or Passed Writing Prof Test

Films of Chris Marker

This academic course considers methodically the seminal work of Chris Marker, the French photographer, writer and documentary filmmaker who combines journalistic montages of historical events into cultural contexts that disclose socioeconomic political history. Marker's at times collaborator Alain Resnais, also of the French New Wave of the Left Bank Film Movement once called Marker "the prototype of the twenty-first-century man." The course will examine Chris Marker's works, focusing on his filmography to include A Grin Without a Cat 1977, Sans Soleil, 1982 and La Jetee, 1962- 66, the evocative science-fiction fable told in still photographs. The course will move onto to reveal Marker's later works to include the review of his multi-media works done for the Museum of Modern Art in New York City entitled Immemorial (1998, 2008) and an interactive multimedia CD-ROM produced for the Centre Pompidou. Considerations of how Marker's work is being examined today will also be topical for study. Marker's astonishingly diverse career that spans more than 50 years to include writing, photography, filmmaking, videography, gallery installation, television and digital multimedia will be examined to reveal how the exceptional works probe memory, cultural memory, history and the complications and paradoxes of new electronic media technologies.

Course number: HNAR-346
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Films of Dardenne Brothers

This academic course probes meticulously the social, economic, political and naturalistic cinema of the Belgium brothers Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne. The Dardenne Brothers, writers, directors and producers have created a notable body of work to include documentary works and their narrative poetic realism. This courses fits into the analysis of cinema in the tradition of auteur study. That being a very important structure to study theoretical and formal issues of cinema via the chronological analysis of a body of work to observe and consider how a body of work takes place over a long period of time and to observe how its text influences and parallels history. The course will investigate The Dardenne Brothers magnum opus to include Rosetta, 1999, The Son, 2002 and several of their documentary works that come prior to their notable success in their narrative work. Issues of work, European economics along with political oversight of the individual immersed in social structures will be studied as they reveal themselves through the brother's cinematic form and language. The course will draw from issues in the ethics of structuring the documentary and its boundaries that lead such attempts at realism to confront or be uttered forth with visual poetics.

Course number: HNAR-345
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Films of Jean-Luc Godard

3

This course is an in-depth auteur study of one of the most influential filmmakers of the Nouvelle Vogue or French New Wave and his influence on art, cinema, and critical thinking since his career began to the present day. Topics include Godard's defiance of the conventions of Hollywood, his radical and unambiguously political understanding of film history, his economic and cultural views, his scholarly interpretations of philosophy and cinema, his participation in film studies and film theory, and his thought-provoking associations between painting, poetry, and cinema.

Course number: HNAR-332
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Films of Luchino Visconti

This course is a comprehensive study of Italian Neo Realism: cinema's power to obsess and to convey the socio-economic, psychological, and political realities of the post WWII era, as well as its influence on new cinema and cultural politics. Visconti's influence on world cinema remains a major voice in style and rhetoric, as it influenced the work of Godard, Fassbinder, Scorsese, and countless others.

Course number: HNAR-333
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Films of Michael Haneke

3

This course is an auteur study of the films of Michael Haneke, one of the most important directors working in Europe today. The course will consider and debate the world view of Haneke's films that frequently interrogate prevailing contemporary ethical dilemmas with precise transparency and uncompromising observation. The course will reflect on why Hollywood in its monolithic denotation does not know how to interpret and consider these films, yet, film history, criticism and reputable film juries across the world esteem this work with their highest honors. Topics that the course will cover include the misfortunes and barren nihilism that Haneke's political and philosophical considerations will be examined. A chronological selection of films will be viewed representing categories and interests that concern Haneke's themes. Discussions, readings and research papers are organized to develop the student's interests in visual culture alongside their own developing visual production.

Course number: HNAR-339
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Films of Rainer Fassbinder

3

An in-depth look at the films of Ranier Fassbinder: director, screenwriter, actor, and one of the most important figures in New German Cinema.

Course number: HNAR-334
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Films of Robert Bresson

Comprehensive study of the social, economic, political and formal complex cinema of Robert Bresson. Analysis of cinema in the tradition of auteur study.

Course number: HNAR-342
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Films of Stanley Kubrick

3

This course examines the vast maze of social, political, and psychological subjects Kubrick's films tour within their stylistic and conceptual density. We will track recurrences and parallels between films, focusing on their historical and theoretical subtext, in order to clarify the nature of his cinematic universe.

Course number: HNAR-336
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Fldwk: Theory & Practice

This course will introduce students to methods for incorporating cultural immersion and social engagement into the creative process, with a focus on the diverse communities of Los Angeles. We will examine how researching and making within real-world urban contexts can inspire creative interventions, foster cross-cultural dialogue, and expose students to unofficial knowledges and alternative ways of learning. Participating students will create and conduct their own locally based research projects that explore opportunities for active engagement with the social, political, and cultural landscapes of our city.

Course number: HSOC-303
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Future Sports Berlin: Cultrl

3

This TDS will explore the "Future of Sports" in Berlin - a city that has a significant history in sporting events and a culture that continually redefines what sport means to its individuals and the community. The project will be sponsored by Adidas and Canyon Bikes with potential other sponsors. Topics to be explored include: future concepts in footwear, apparel, equipment, branded events and retail, digital interaction, etc. that will redefine the future performance and participation in sports. The project will leverage the immersion into the Berlin culture and interacting with local experts, sponsors and designers. Available to fifth term and above students by application. Experience working in trans-disciplinary teams. Immersion into the unique Berlin culture to inspire project direction. Conceptual development of future-forward vision-casting ideas. Interacting with professionals from sponsoring organizations.

Course number: HSOC-802A
Prerequisite: n/a

Future Sports Berlin: Ger Lng

3

This TDS will explore the "Future of Sports" in Berlin - a city that has a significant history in sporting events and a culture that continually redefines what sport means to its individuals and the community. The project will be sponsored by Adidas and Canyon Bikes with potential other sponsors. Topics to be explored include: future concepts in footwear, apparel, equipment, branded events and retail, digital interaction, etc. that will redefine the future performance and participation in sports. The project will leverage the immersion into the Berlin culture and interacting with local experts, sponsors and designers. Available to fifth term and above students by application. Experience working in trans-disciplinary teams. German language course provided by 3rd party inLingua.

Course number: HHUM-802A
Prerequisite: n/a

Future of Science & Technology

3

The future isn't just something that happens but something that can and should be shaped by people with vision; choosing the correct path cannot be left entirely to the scientists and technologists, nor to politicians and entrepreneurs. This class will focus on understanding the basic science behind the upcoming revolutions in bio-technology, artificial intelligence, and quantum science, and on engaging students in developing a shared vision of a desirable future. Topics will include: robotics and artificial intelligence; quantum, nano, and bio-technology; future energy sources; and mankind's possible future in space. The range of problems that our society will face in coming years will be discussed, with particular emphasis on the science behind issues such as global warming. Ethical dilemmas posed by technology will also be explored.

Course number: HSCI-216
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Gender Project

3

In this advanced undergraduate seminar, students will use their own imagination to explore the complicated role of sexual desire and gender identity in contemporary art and design, and to question whether the arts are complicit in the gendering of social and personal space. Through reading, writing, discussion, and art-making, we will address important, if potentially uncomfortable, issues surrounding childhood sexuality, intersexuality, perversion, prostitution, pornography, casual sex, acquaintance rape, marriage, and morality. While we will touch upon traditional issues in academic gender studies (feminism, queer theory, the "nature vs. nurture" debate), we mostly will grapple with human desire and creative potentiality in our individual quests for friendship, sex, power, and love.

Course number: HSOC-201
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Genre Lit: Goth, Det., Sci-Fi

3

Much of today's popular storytelling is informed by genre conventions that originated in literature more than 100 years ago, specifically (and chronologically) in Gothic, Detective, and Sci-Fi novels and short stories. Understanding the "language" of these genres makes us more fluent and adept contemporary storytellers, and can inspire us to innovate, to create something new. This class will define, track, and evaluate conventions in these genres through to the present day, attending especially to texts that combine tropes from more than one kind of story. Students will generate critical and creative responses to the material covered in class.

Course number: HNAR-313
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Going Viral

3

By the mid-1990s, epidemics had seeped both into the cultural consciousness and public discourse. Since then, outbreak narratives have continued to resonate with changing anxieties in the American cultural and social fabric. This course will focus on American films and TV shows from the mid-1990s to the present that depict the three main types of outbreak narratives: The Globalization Outbreak includes those (like Contagion and Outbreak) that focus on the repercussions of globalization and the ultimate failure of national boundaries to protect; The Terrorist Outbreak includes those (like 24 and 12 Monkeys) centered around the threat of bio-terrorism; The Post-Apocalypse Outbreak includes those (like World War Z and The Walking Dead) that explore what happens after the virus has decimated populations. This section will also continue a discussion of the contemporary zombie figure.

Course number: HNAR-380
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Graduate Writing Studio

2

In this course, English Language Learners develop proficiency in English Language reading, speaking, and writing as it relates to graduate level discourse and critique.

Course number: HWRI-511
Prerequisite: n/a

Graduate Writing Workshop

0

This is a general writing advising workshop for graduate students seeking help with their writing. No enrollment required. Check with your department for advising workshop office hours.

Course number: HHUM-005
Prerequisite: n/a

Graphic Design History 1

3

This course traces the development of visual communication from the first evidence of human image-making through the mid 20th century, including the evolution of letterform design from the earliest pictograms into the Middle Ages and through the Industrial Revolution. Social, scientific, and technological development are stressed as factors impacting the field. Through lectures, readings, and assigned essays, media presentations, and exams, students hone their ability to recognize conceptual and stylistic trends from the past and how they communicated ideas in the service of education, political messaging, business/commerce, and arts and culture. This knowledge will help students solve problems in today's studio graphics classes and clarify the current influence of graphic design on how society thinks about itself and the products it consumes, plus the role of visual communications in politics.

Course number: HHIS-240
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam HHIS-110 Introduction to Modernism

Graphic Design History 2

3

This course presents a critical examination of issues, theories, and practices relevant to contemporary professional graphic communication, with an emphasis on design creativity and progress as rooted in artistic, cultural, political, economic, and technological contexts. The class picks up from Graphic Design History 1 at the mid-century Modernist era, examining an eclectic diversity of significant individuals and groups up to the present. Topics of discussion include Postmodernism, new media, and design ethics.

Course number: HHIS-340
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam Take HHIS-240 Graphic Design History 1

Greek Mythology

3

Whether your interests lie in narrative, in archetype, in religion, in social and political organization, or in the development of "Western" ethics and mores, the collection of works that contain what we think of as mythology are indispensable resources to understanding some of the base material from which emerged European/American civilization. In this course we will read some of the major works of Greek and Roman "mythological" writing, as well as look into the historical contexts that helped to create the stories that continue to vibrate in the imaginations of we who are almost 3,000 years removed from the oldest of the texts.

Course number: HNAR-320
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Guided Study: Bus/Prof

Course number: HBPP-496
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Guided Study: Bus/Prof

Course number: HBPP-396
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

HHUM Elect 3 Cr Req

Psuedo course block

Course number: HHUM-000.PC3
Prerequisite: Take 3 credits from subject HCRT, HHIS, HNAR, or HWRI

Hist & Theory Space: Looking

3

History and Theory of Space: Looking Back Rather than a survey course that focuses solely on the social production of space throughout history, this class examines the ways in which environmental designers and architects in the 19th and 20th centuries have looked backwards, borrowing from other traditions and appropriating the signs and aesthetic qualities from past cultures to produce spaces that became entirely emblematic of their own time. By using this analytical lens, students will both learn how space was conceptualized according to a given set of social, cultural, political and economic forces as well as the way in which these elements get examined and rewritten anew according to a new set of historical constructs. Layering our analysis in this way allows us to explore a greater breadth of work while probing the ways designers, through their work, have engaged in a dialogue across space and time.

Course number: HHIS-293
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Hist Entertainment&Media Dsgn

From the scripted spaces of the Baroque to the mediated streets of today's cities, from the birth of cinema to the manipulation of space in contemporary media, this history course explores worlds invented through technology. We learn how politics and the body are part of the convergence of media and entertainment from the nineteenth century arcade, to the vaudeville circuit, to Coney Island, to Theme Parks and themed cities; from early cinema to the late 20th century extension of the body through special effects and hidden effects, to the parallel worlds that invade us, and lure us. We also critically examine emerging trends and contemporary modes, and ruptures still remaining from media in the past, plus how the viewer responds to all these entertainment environments.

Course number: HHIS-211
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Hist of American Television

3

This course is a critical survey of the history of American television, from the 1940s to the present. The course examines the interrelationships between programming and genre, business practices,social trends, and culture. While television programs will be surveyed in terms of chronology, this course examines them as cultural artifacts and industrial products that reflect such issues as class,consumerism, gender, desire, race, and national identity. Assigned texts and screenings will outline major historical trends and shifts,and consider programs and series in terms of cultural issues (issues of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality), consumption patterns (how people have watch and engage with TV), as well as industrial practice (policy, regulation, business strategy). This course is designed to help develop a critical framework for understanding television as a cultural, economic,and political institution and to encourage students to become critically informed television viewers, media scholars, and media makers.

Course number: HSOC-235
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Hist of American Television

3

This course is a critical survey of the history of American television, from the 1940s to the present. The course examines the interrelationships between programming and genre, business practices,social trends, and culture. While television programs will be surveyed in terms of chronology, this course examines them as cultural artifacts and industrial products that reflect such issues as class,consumerism, gender, desire, race, and national identity. Assigned texts and screenings will outline major historical trends and shifts,and consider programs and series in terms of cultural issues (issues of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality), consumption patterns (how people have watch and engage with TV), as well as industrial practice (policy, regulation, business strategy). This course is designed to help develop a critical framework for understanding television as a cultural, economic,and political institution and to encourage students to become critically informed television viewers, media scholars, and media makers.

Course number: HHIS-235
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Hist of Science & Technology

Everything, and everyone, has a history that informs our present and future. This history stretches back into the past, and every history has its own history. The influence of science has saturated social, cultural and political life around the world for centuries. This class is designed to introduce you to the history of science and technology, starting in the 16th century and going up through the twentieth century and into the 21st, and emphasizing the 19th and 20th centuries. The course topics will be global, although with an accent on Western science and technology. Rather than being comprehensive (an impossible task), we will work through six specific topics. Each of these topics has a long arc and covers a tremendous amount of useful breadth and depth, as follows: Biological evolution; the history of scientific illustration; the history of color and color theory; the history of models (the universe, evolution, revolutions in science, etc.); environmental history; and aerospace and the Cold War. We will also have several guest speakers, and visit several exhibits and libraries.

Course number: HHIS-291
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History & Futures of IxD

Interaction design and digital technology are changing the way humans relate to everything, from games to relationships to work. Designers of digital technology products no longer regard their job as designing a physical object--beautiful or utilitarian--but as designing our interactions with it. This class introduces the industry's history, from humans' first tools through the industrial revolution to computer-supported tools of interaction design. Charting the history of entrepreneurial design in technology, students will see how their own design process, focusing on people and prototypes, prepares them for emerging technologies, social change, and the future of human interactions.

Course number: HHIS-260
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History & Theory of Space 2

This course explores the multifaceted nature of urban, public, and private spaces, paying special attention to the sociopolitical, cultural, and economic forces that shape our built environments. We will review a range of scholarship from various academic disciplines and intellectual spheres, but remain focused on the realm of design and particular design products that provide us with a framework to understand the context within which particular spatial and design outcomes are observed. Aiming to contextualize various phases of design and spatial strategies since the late 18th century, we will pay particular attention to the forces that "produce" space, recognizing that gender, culture, and the everyday life of cities must be considered and evaluated against various theoretical and ideological perspectives. Interior and exterior spaces, exhibits, entertainment spaces, bars, cafes, sites of collections (e.g., museums), and many other realms that define and are affected by design will be analyzed in order for us to understand, albeit in an ephemeral manner, the forces that shape what we call our spatial experience.

Course number: HHIS-390
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam and HHIS-290 History and Theory of Space 1

History of Advertising

3

The class is intended to establish an historical context from which students can build a solid understanding of advertising's role in the development and reflection of society. Through lectures, readings, guest speakers, and exams, students expand their awareness of historical events and hone their ability to recognize conceptual and stylistic trends from the past. Extensive slide presentations support the lectures and the readings. Advertising students in particular can find immediate use for this course, as they solve problems in studio advertising classes and re-interpret the historical material into new ways of addressing the promotion of products and services in the agency environment. With a clearer understanding of social evolution reflected in history, students can move toward creating more socially responsible work for the present day.

Course number: HHIS-200
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History of Art 1

3

Beginning with the Paleolithic and Neolithic periods and extending into the High Renaissance, we will examine the interrelationships between the production and consumption of art, and science and religion. How have the latter influenced the former? What roles have religious institutions and scientific discoveries had on artists and designers? How have artists and designers responded to the demands of religious institutions and the discoveries of scientists?

Course number: HHIS-220
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History of Art 2

3

Students in the course will examine the diversity of artistic production (painting, sculpture, and architecture, among others) in Europe during the 15th to the late 19th centuries, a time of tremendous historical change. They will analyze the ideas and values encoded in the most significant works of art to arise from this period by considering the social, cultural, and political circumstances in which these objects were produced and understood. Students will explore not only how objects were shaped by the society in which they were made, but also how art contributed to social and political transformation. The required text will provide the chronological bearings, historical background, and images for the course.

Course number: HHIS-221
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History of Art 3

3

Students will engage with the history of visual culture in the second half of the twentieth century, with an eye to how the conventions of artistic practice, its criticism, and its exhibition change during this era. We will consider a variety of media, including painting, photography, film, performance, sculpture, and installation, and will examine the shifting roles of each in the realm of contemporary culture. We will also investigate the changing significance of terms such as Modernism, avant-garde, and author within the social and cultural realm. We will remain focused on the always-changing political landscape over the past sixty years, including the trauma of one World War, the Cold War, the various liberation movements starting in the 1960s, the dissolution of the Communist Bloc, and the AIDS crisis, in addition to the ever-growing late-capitalist globalization we continue to experience today.

Course number: HHIS-222
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History of Automobile Design

3

This course will examine the evolution of automobile design: we will learn about the growth of the industry and at what point design, as we know it, became an important part of making cars. The historic development of the design process will also be examined, along with significant automotive and industrial designers who have influenced car design. Many cars, from the mundane to the exotic, from all points in automotive history, will be discussed and reviewed, with emphasis on those that have proved to be particularly influential on subsequent designs or have remained design icons. Although analysis of their design will be an important part of the course, their industrial, social, and commercial significance will also be considered.

Course number: HHIS-281
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History of Cinema 1

3

Students explore how the aesthetic and technical development of the cinema (from its beginnings until 1941) established, defined, refined, and changed the nature of the medium and the way we see, in the context of historical, cultural, political, and socio-economic determinants. Students also examine the ideas, implications, and ramifications of important trends, movements, styles, genres, theories, and directors. Finally, through intensive analysis of the ways in which the formal elements of design of the image are manipulated for expressive purposes, students learn how to really "see" and more fully experience the expansive potential of the cinema.

Course number: HHIS-230
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History of Cinema 2

3

Students explore how the aesthetic and technical development of the cinema (from 1941 to the present) defined, refined, and changed the nature of the medium and the way we see, in the context of historical, cultural, political, and socio-economic determinants. Students also examine the ideas, implications, and ramifications of important trends, movements, styles, genres, theories, and directors. Finally, through intensive analysis of the ways in which the formal elements of design of the image are manipulated for expressive purposes, students learn how to really "see" and more fully experience the expansive potential of the cinema.

Course number: HHIS-231
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History of Fashion

This course examines the history of high fashion, from Louis XIV through the 20th Century. Through audio-visual presentations, the course will focus not only on the origins of European high fashion design but the environments, objects and culture within each period. Through quizzes, exercises, and term project, students will be encouraged to use best practices to relate historic research back to their own majors.

Course number: HHIS-254
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History of Illustration

3

This course examines the history of illustration, from the printed works of the Renaissance old masters, through the "golden age" of American illustration, to today's new media imagery. Students will compare the creative works of more than 100 illustrators and fine artists and analyze how illustration has redefined both its boundaries and functions in mass media. Class discussion topics include: artistic innovations, visual literacy, aesthetic theories, and the relationship between fine art and illustration.

Course number: HHIS-250
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History of Industrial Design

3

This course provides a basic understanding of the movements, ideas, and events of industrial design history over the past 150 years, and reveals, through study of past masters, both how the profession has evolved to its present state and where it is going. The class will serve as a foundation for a life well spent in the practice of design.

Course number: HHIS-280
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History of Photo 1

3

This academic course presents an artistic, cultural, and social history of photography. Through readings of critical texts, slide presentations, movies, and a field trip, students will examine the varied uses and functions of photography. Themes include: war photography and ethics, the history of food photography, the portrait, and the pictures generation.

Course number: HHIS-270
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History of Photo 2

3

This academic course offers a thematic survey of historical and contemporary issues pertaining to photography, in the context of art and the world at large. Through readings of critical texts, slide presentations, movies, and a field trip, students will examine the ways that photography has been utilized by artists, journalists, scientists, amateurs, and a range of other practitioners; how meaning has been constructed in the photographic image; and how photography has been used in society. Themes include: new topographics, photography and documentary, the photographic archive, and the digital world.

Course number: HHIS-271
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History of the User

In the aftermath of WWII, information theorists and ergonomics experts joined forces to test a new hypothesis: if complex technological systems (e.g. vehicle control panels, consumer electronics, interstate highways) could be designed to mesh with the needs and abilities of their human users, then it might be possible to facilitate proper use--and to prevent disasters--without any advance training or instruction. From these experiments was born the user, a creature ensconced in a world of tools and networks customized to his or her unique physiological and psychological preferences. Today, there is hardly a field of design practice that has not incorporated the paradigm of user experience design (UxD) as part of its core methodology--indeed, the memory of a time before the user has all but faded. To correct this pervasive amnesia, this course takes a critical, in-depth look at the history and theory of user-oriented design from the early 1900s to the present day. Through writing and creative projects, students will be asked to reflect on the status of the user in their own practices (whether in design or fine art), and to ask what kinds of behavior--personal as well as political--this term does and doesn't allow.

Course number: HHIS-265
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

History-Entertainment Design

Entertainment design history develops students' ability to conceptualize and express creative ideas related to stories and experiences.

Course number: HHIS-210
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Human Factors & Design Psych

3

This course will familiarize students with general human factors principles that are at the heart of any effective design. Students will be introduced to areas of human performance, cognition, ergonomics, memory, and behavior. Reading assignments plus in-class and take-home projects will expose students to a variety of human factors theories and design examples. Two group projects are required: these allow students to apply the principles they have learned.

Course number: HSCI-202
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Human Rights Movements in U.S.

3

Using art, novels, movies, plays, speakers and interviews, we will learn about and compare the civil rights and human rights movements in the United States over the last 240 years. In this class we will cover the meaning of Civil Rights and Human Rights and how these developed over the history of the United States. We will look at the situation for individuals and groups that gave rise to the Civil Rights movements in the United States for African Americans, Women, LBGT community, Native Americans, Latinos/Chicanos, Immigrant Groups, Prisoners and Disabled Children and Adults. We will analyze how these groups became aware of themselves as an interest group, what their goals and strategies were and presently are; who were their leaders and other allies; what were their challenges and successes. We will look at the events, actions, arts and expression of these movements as expressed by members of the movement as well as the dominant culture by reading primary sources, hearing music, reading poetry and watching many movies.

Course number: HSOC-331
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Humanities Transfer Cr - CW

Course number: HHUM-TXCW
Prerequisite: n/a

Humanities Transfer Cr - FILM

Course number: HHUM-TXFILM
Prerequisite: n/a

Humanities Transfer Cr - LIT

Course number: HHUM-TXLIT
Prerequisite: n/a

Humanities Transfer Credit

Course number: HHUM-TRNSFR
Prerequisite: n/a

IP: Law & Busn for Artists

3

Law and Business for Artists and Designers covers a full range of legal and business issues, including the language used in contracts that affects the license, sale, and creation of designs and other original works of art and design. This course will cover: the basics of copyright law, fair use and copyright defenses, trademark law and registration, maintaining trademark rights and avoiding infringements, and patent law. We learn how to file a copyright application; searching the availability of a trademark and filing a trademark application; how to get a business license, form a corporation, prepare a deal memo, and negotiate a contract; and how to negotiate the resolution of a dispute, a new job position, and a promotion.

Course number: HPRO-300
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

IS: History

Course number: HHIS-975
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Illumination: Lighting

3

This course introduces students to numerous aspects of illumination, from the practical to the conceptual, from the creative to the technological. We will survey the history, technology, and design of lighting through both research and hands-on experimentation. Field trips, lectures, readings, and guest presentations will cover topics including: optics, basic circuits, and electrical wiring; technologies such as LEDs, fiber-optics, CCFLs, EL and neon; lighting in space, and of sculpture and products; history and theory of color; artificial illumination and day lighting; the affect of light on neurology and psychology; retail, commercial, and residential lighting strategies.

Course number: HSCI-203
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Immigrant/1st Gen American Lit

American Literature as we now know it was in its very beginnings composed largely of the voices of people who arrived to this continent from somewhere else, as a political and economic refugees, religious pilgrims or captive slaves. Today, American Literature is still enriched by the voice of The Immigrant and/or The First Generation American, each of whom navigate geographies and cultural systems sometimes parallel to "native-born" Americans or in the shadows as invisibles/undesirables. Often, their stories reveal truths about the culture in which they arrive, and provide opportunities for thoughtful discussion about context, story-telling and the current state of the "new Americans." We will read novels and a memoir published in the last twenty years, as well as other selective readings from current events to inform our discussion and writing projects.

Course number: HNAR-210
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Indep Study

Course number: HWRI-495
Prerequisite: n/a

Independent Study Humanities

3

Course number: HHUM-395
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Independent Study Humanities

3

Course number: HHUM-495
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Independent Study: Bus/Prof

Course number: HBPP-395
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Independent Study: Bus/Prof

3

Course number: HBPP-495
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Independent Study: Business

Course number: HBUS-495
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Independent Study: Sci & Tech

Course number: HSCI-490
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Independent Study: Sci & Tech

Course number: HSCI-495
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Independent Study: Soc Sci

Course number: HSOC-495
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Independent Study: Soc Sci

Course number: HSOC-395
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Innovating Medical Devices

3

The goal of the ABI program is to teach students a framework for developing medical device innovations that address unmet clinical needs (viewing those needs as opportunities) and to prepare students for careers in healthcare, product development, and entrepreneurship. The course consists of a series of weekly lectures which are intended to complement practical experience that students gain through an interdisciplinary team-based project. During the winter quarter, the project teams are assigned an unmet clinical need identified within the UCLA Health System, and teams are tasked with brainstorming and developing concepts to solve these medical needs. Lectures include invited guest speakers and panels composed of UCLA faculty as well as industry representatives from venture capital, medical device, design and law firms. The spring quarter of the course focuses on concept refinement, prototyping, provisional patent submission, and building a business plan. Additionally, this quarter each project team is assigned an industry mentor to provide guidance on the product development process and entrepreneurship as it relates to medical devices. The culmination of the course is the completion of a business plan and pitch by each project team, which will be presented to a panel of venture capitalists at the end of quarter.

Course number: HSOC-458
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Insights

3

As design assumes an increasingly strategic role in both for-profit and non-profit domains, designers must expand their ability to think contextually about people, organizations, markets, brands, and publics they're designing for. This course teaches students how to become insightful about the world by their research and analysis skills to translate information into strategic opportunities for design. Insights introduces various approaches to trend research socio-cultural, technological, and design spheres and explores how designers can utilize trends to inform their creative work. Insights was originally around industry practice informed by corporations like Nokia, Nike, Target, and Apple that have dedicated "Design Insights" teams. It continues to be by the methods and practices of researchers who specialize in providing credible, strategic insights to their clients.

Course number: HSOC-205
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Insights for Trans Design

3

"Insights" is a co-requisite of the sixth-term transportation design studio. This class guides designers in the creation of innovative vehicle concepts based on a strong foundation of research. Designers learn how to create compelling conceptual frameworks, driven by unique insights and articulated in a thoughtful, meaningful context. Since this class responds to a new sponsor brief each term, our focus is customized for each project, but our process remains constant. We employ a range of design research methodologies (primary and secondary) including observation, photo-documentation, ethnography, interviews, and trend tracking and forecasting. We keep the human story at the center of what we do, while considering broader trends that impact culture. Our work is closely coordinated and integrated with the design curriculum in the sixth-term studio class.

Course number: HSOC-285
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Internship: Human

Course number: HHUM-490
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Interplay: Collaboration Lab

This intensive lab-structured course will strengthen your understanding of interdisciplinary collaboration. Museum environments will be used as the focal point and main context for examining how multidisciplinary teams work together to develop a wide variety of contemporary exhibitions. In the classroom, you will learn collaboration skills via experiential exercises within ever evolving group scenarios throughout the term that will be complemented by a range of academic readings. Field trips to local museums to meet with the creators of six current exhibits will breakdown the collaborative interplay between design and curation. Students will be required to coordinate their own transportation for the field trips and pay any necessary museum admission fees.

Course number: HPRO-333
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Intro to Computer Programming

3

Cal Tech course via exchange program

Course number: CAL-CS1
Prerequisite: n/a

Intro to Entrepreneurship

3

In this course students will gain an understanding of how to create entrepreneurial ventures from self-initiated projects. They will learn how artwork, design and products are developed from the entrepreneurial standpoint including how a design varies based on the business context. Some students will choose to create a new company and will develop a start-up strategy to evaluate the feasibility of the company (ies). Products can be two-dimensional graphics or illustrations applied to existing product categories, new stylistic designs, entertainment or media properties, product design, brand concepts or technical inventions.

Course number: HENT-100
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Intro to Mechanical Prototypng

Cal Tech course via exchange program

Course number: CAL-013
Prerequisite: n/a

Intro to Mechatronics

Cal Tech course via exchange program

Course number: CAL-007
Prerequisite: n/a

Intro to Modernism

3

The class will explore, discuss, analyze, and compare various aspects of modernist culture including the visual arts, design and architecture, film, the performing arts, music, literature, and science and technology, and provide a historical perspective and critical insight into the political, social, and philosophical dynamics of the era, and its relevance to our current time.

Course number: HHIS-110
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Intro to Robotics

3

Introduction to Robotics offers you the opportunity to explore the increasing role of automated mechanisms in our world and learn what it takes to build your own robots. This course is part survey, part technical application. Hands-on robot designing and building figures strongly as we encounter topics through team "design challenges," in which we see what makes up a robot and investigate ways to control them to do what we want.

Course number: HSCI-231
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Intro to Social Innovation

Course number: HSOC-209
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Introduction to Psychology

3

Introduction to Psychology Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes, in humans and other species. This course will provide a general introduction to the primary subject matter areas of psychology including lifespan development, emotion, social processes, personality, psychopathology, the brain, stress and stress response systems, learning, perception, as well as exploration of the creative process and discussion of course content as it relates specifically to that process.

Course number: HSOC-221
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Introduction to Urban Studies

3

Introduction to Urban Studies is a course designed to address many key issues of urban life, both past and present. Starting with a general understanding of cities as collections of spaces and places shaped by human activity, the course will explore the varied forces determining the proliferation, expansion, and even decline of the urban form. Are the cities of the 21st century the cure or the cause of the many challenges facing us in the world today? How have people studied cities and how might we study them now? These questions and many others will emerge over the course's duration. Students will use this course to make the connections between topics often discussed separately, like housing, transportation, and urban politics. In addition, Introduction to Urban Studies will shine a spotlight on the modern city in the global context by linking the urban to processes of migration, investment, and environmental impact.

Course number: HSOC-271
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Is Art Possible After Google?

How should we gauge the impact of the Internet on contemporary art? Does the advent of Web-based image aggregators and curatorial platforms (e.g. Pinterest, Contemporary Art Daily, thejogging.tumblr.com, #ArtSelfie) spell doom for the art profession, or at least, for its traditional institutions and markets? Or, to adopt a more optimistic perspective, have the databases, online archives, and retail networks of Web 2.0 revitalized the methods and materials available to contemporary artists, enabling universal access to supply chains and data flows? In this class, we will seek to understand the practical challenges posed to artists (and also critics, curators, spectators) by the omnipresent Web; we will also consider the "post-internet" condition in terms of the larger historical trajectory of modernism and its antecedents.

Course number: HSOC-365
Prerequisite: n/a

Is Art Possible After Google?

How should we gauge the impact of the Internet on contemporary art? Does the advent of Web-based image aggregators and curatorial platforms (e.g. Pinterest, Contemporary Art Daily, thejogging.tumblr.com, #ArtSelfie) spell doom for the art profession, or at least, for its traditional institutions and markets? Or, to adopt a more optimistic perspective, have the databases, online archives, and retail networks of Web 2.0 revitalized the methods and materials available to contemporary artists, enabling universal access to supply chains and data flows? In this class, we will seek to understand the practical challenges posed to artists (and also critics, curators, spectators) by the omnipresent Web; we will also consider the "post-internet" condition in terms of the larger historical trajectory of modernism and its antecedents.

Course number: HCRT-365
Prerequisite: n/a

James Joyce's 'Ulysses'

Arguably one of the most important and influential works of fiction of the 150 years, James Joyce's 'Ulysses' is also famously difficult to read. At least that's its reputation. This course is designed to be a guided tour through the novel's 18 shifting chapters, in order to unlock its humor, invention and humanity, and to help dispel its mystery. 'Ulysses' takes place on a single day (June 16, 1904) in the life of literature's great antihero, Leopold Bloom. Along the way of an almost hourly chronicle, the pages take readers through the inner thoughts of principle and minor characters, parodies of literary styles, critiques of imperialism, racism, and popular culture and highbrow culture. It does this while also mimicking the structure of Homer's 'Odyssey', shifting the styles of chapters and complicating the nature of authorship and narrative authority. Joyce's biographer Richard Ellmann wrote that, whether we read 'Ulysses' or not, we've been influenced by it. This course presents the opportunity to see what Ellmann means.

Course number: HNAR-303
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Life Without Objects

3

Concerns about the economic and ecological sustainability of industrial design converge around the status of the object itself, raising questions about whether design must generate objects at all. But how might product designers create a life without objects? Using historical and contemporary sources, this course will examine a series of transdisciplinary case studies to help students explore this question. Course materials will include current dialogues around anthropogenic climate change, historical and contemporary reactions against mass production, discourses of decluttering, corporate minimalism, zero waste lifestyles, and the politics of repurposing. The goal of this course is to help students engage critically with the social, political, economic, and ideological implications of a product-centered society, and grapple with the ethical concerns around designing and making in a world full of stuff.

Course number: HCRT-284
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Life Without Objects

3

Concerns about the economic and ecological sustainability of industrial design converge around the status of the object itself, raising questions about whether design must generate objects at all. But how might product designers create a life without objects? Using historical and contemporary sources, this course will examine a series of transdisciplinary case studies to help students explore this question. Course materials will include current dialogues around anthropogenic climate change, historical and contemporary reactions against mass production, discourses of decluttering, corporate minimalism, zero waste lifestyles, and the politics of repurposing. The goal of this course is to help students engage critically with the social, political, economic, and ideological implications of a product-centered society, and grapple with the ethical concerns around designing and making in a world full of stuff.

Course number: HSOC-284
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Light & Color

3

Why is the sky blue? Why is blood red? Why is the sun yellow? Why does a blood-red sun, setting in a deep blue sky, occasionally turn green? This course begins with a history of light, from mystical representations of light and vision in ancient Greece to the strange quantum duality of particles and waves. From there we will shift to a more classical approach: to scattering, and why sunsets are red and the sky is blue. From the properties of light waves, we will move on to refraction and lenses. There will be one major class project: designing and using an advanced pinhole camera, which utilize many optics concepts and offer unparalleled opportunities for experimentation and artistic exploration.

Course number: HSCI-217
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Like: a Competition

What does it mean to "like" something? 'Like' is a ubiquitous, bandied-about word in contemporary society: it's usually a declarative, democratic, and safe way to express an opinion. We often share our aesthetic interests by publicly saying what we like. In an attempt to up-the-ante and make us more committed to the things we like, this course will give us tools to defend our own pleasures, desires, and fantasies, and to make what we like have consequences. We'll think of art and design as a competition --- not just a job, success or money --- but for the hears and minds of audiences. "LIKE: a competition" will address personal and cultural formations of taste and beauty and will look at strategies for describing the creative process in a world of subjective preference. We will deal with a variety of subjects, including the correlation between music and visual culture and the visual-historical moments in art that signal aesthetic shifts in societal thinking. We will examine the history of political and artistic manifestos as fundamental ways in which people transform their theories into action. Students will critically examine the apogees and pitfalls of political theory and aesthetic dogma, and maybe have the opportunity to write an aesthetic manifesto of their own. This is a transdisciplinary discussion and project-based course that attempts to place the humanities deep within art and design practices. It questions the distinction of theory from practice and thinking from doing. As such, participants will receive both studio and academic credit. (3 units of H&S Critical Thinking)

Course number: HCRT-368
Prerequisite: Take TDS-368

Los Angeles Histories/Myths 1

3

L.A. was a postmodern city by 1890, and has remained for generations "the most photographed and least remembered city in the world." Students in this class will trace the historical trends that have shaped these contradictions.

Course number: HSOC-302
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Magical Realisms

3

Magical Realism exists because in literature, anything is possible. This is not only a question of "suspension of disbelief", but of applied layers of truth as the author assumes them. We'll look at stories beyond belief and reason to find possibility, bask in the richness of language and become lost in worlds on no map or right here in Los Angeles. We will read five novels, as well as other selected readings from world literature to inform our discussion and writing projects. The objective of this class is to consider what is possible in literature, and what can be identified as "Magical Realism" versus "Surrealism" or "Fantasy", as well as to provide opportunities for discussion of techniques of story-reading as well as story-telling.

Course number: HNAR-325
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Maker Communities of NE LA

3

This class, collaboratively produced by ArtCenter and Occidental, will explore, through history and in contemporary examples, the creative production of communities such as Highland Park, Mount Washington, Eagle Rock, Glassell Park and other areas surrounding the foothills, Arroyo Seco and Los Angeles River, considering how these specific geographies have fostered creative communities. Field trips, artist visits and workshops will occur on a regular basis as part of the class.

Course number: TDS-381A
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Manufacturing Technology

3

This course is structured around the major fabrication technologies used by designers and manufacturers throughout the world. The emphasis will be on current and emerging manufacturing technologies that many design studios are currently associated with. The major areas covered will be Materials and Processes used in the Metal Industry, The Plastic Industry, The Wood Industry, The Ceramic Industry and The Glass Industry. Technical experts in each area will add their support along with unique Tours of each related industry. There will be a text book which was written just for design professionals. Guest Lecturers and special Tours are a big part of the course. The object is to expose students to many of the major manufacturing technologies that can influence their designs and the ultimate production of related products.

Course number: HSCI-280
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Marketing and Self Promotion

This class is designed for photography students who'll be guided by a creative services consultant specializing in working with photographers and photography agencies. The world is a big place, just putting up your website and sitting back and waiting for jobs to flow in, does not cut it in this competitive field of photography. This class will focus on effective and creative marketing strategies individualized for each student. Topics include identifying who the client is and how to market a distinct message to that audience. Also covered in the class will be promotional campaigns, budgeting for marketing, the effective use of the changing social media landscape and portfolio presentations. To help each student, students will receive a one on one interview to develop a marketing plan tailored to their needs and skill sets. At the end of the term, each student will have a better grasp on where to find their clients, how to approach them, how to interact and how to keep them.

Course number: HPRO-320
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Materials & Methods 1

3

This course introduces students to the many universal plastic materials and fabrication processes currently used in design and product development. Students will learn how to recognize and evaluate materials and processes that influence product development, and how to do basic cost estimating relating to different processes and aspects of model making.

Course number: HSCI-206
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Moby Dick

3

In the middle of the 19th Century, before the Civil War, America was in a state of dynamic, nation-defining flux. In the midst of the political turmoil and his own, personal tumult, Herman Melville produced the definitive novel of the American 19th Century, Moby Dick. And while the book is famous for its obsessive, maniacal central figure, Captain Ahab and his relentless hunt for the monstrous white whale that took off his leg, Melville wove into the adventure story the conflicts of race, power, industrialization and colonialism that were, and, some would argue, still are at the core of American life. This course will explore Moby Dick as a work of literature and as a record of its historical moment.

Course number: HNAR-312
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Money Math for the Right Brain

3

Are designers business people? Business financial statements are intimidating for the left brain-oriented designer. This course will demystify business financial statements through hands-on work from a design perspective. Students will research and analyze Profit & Loss Statements, Cash Flow Statements and Balance Sheets of publicly traded companies of their choice. From this analysis, they will create financial statements of their own from models provided by the instructor. The course goal is not that students become CFOs, but that they are conversant in the language of business in order to thrive in a multidisciplinary team environment.

Course number: HBUS-220
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Monstrous Futures

3

In an era when we are capable of destroying all life on earth in a single day of nuclear strikes, or over several decades through the reckless destruction of our environment, no other film or TV genre addresses the subject of our future as fully as science fiction. In addition to spurring many technological innovations in moviemaking throughout its history, science fiction films traditionally have undertaken serious philosophical exploration and social, cultural, and ideological critique. They often address, implicitly or explicitly, our assumptions, our values, our aspirations, and our fears. And, because they speak directly to their times, they serve as a useful barometer for how people viewed themselves and their world at the time they were created. This course introduces the SF film genre, its methods of inquiry, its notable experiments, and through a series of interdisciplinary readings and an eclectic selection of films and television series', the stakes in our imaginative visions of our future.

Course number: HNAR-220
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Nanotechnology + Design

This class will use lectures, discussion, and hands-on experimental work to develop a holistic understanding of nanotechnology with no need for prior high-level scientific knowledge or mathematics. With tentative guest lectures from experts, as well as a field trip, students will have weekly readings and writing assignments where they will be expected to synthesize what they learned by relating it to their own life and art/design practice. The final project entails looking into the future to develop a nanoscience project proposal.

Course number: HSCI-233
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Narrative Strategies

3

Almost all writing involves some sort of narrative. So does film, illustration, advertising, photography, and fine art (among other disciplines). This course will look at narrative as a group of strategies that can be applied to various literary genres (i.e. fiction, poetry, screenwriting, etc.) or to work outside of traditional genres in the formation of new or alternative modes of story telling or message-bringing. We will look at "traditional" and "experimental" uses of narrative as used in language, and then try our own hands at writing through and with the strategies we examine (and, possibly move beyond them). We will also look at examples of work within the categories of Art Center's various disciplines to see how narrative is used in them, and consider what kind of recombinant possibilities might be explored. In both what we read and what we write, we will focus on four main narrative types: linear narrative, nonlinear narrative, lyrical narrative and fragmented narrative.

Course number: HNAR-200
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Narrative Structure

3

Narrative Structure will take the same approach as Critical Practice I, which provides a basic visual vocabulary or rhetoric for different areas of focus, such as film genres, contemporary art, television, internet media, and others, based on the expertise of the instructor.

Course number: HCRT-200
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Neurons Sparking

3

With neuroscientists blazing the trail to understanding the neurobiology of human perception and computational technologists crunching the numbers to create new means of neuroimaging, artists are compelled to ask new and different kinds of questions about their own engaged process of looking, seeing, and doing. Pivoting on the Allosphere research conducted by the Art, Media, and Technology team at UC Santa Barbara, Neurons Sparking! introduces students to the continuum of intellectual and art histories and theories that enrich today's art and biotech practices. Strong consideration will be given to the early modern artists--Monet, Seurat, Cezanne--in light of their interests in science and technology of their day. To ground our discussion in a contemporary context, we will visit the Allosphere. With our minds and brains challenged by new research into synesthesia and computational abstraction, we take up an informed discussion of perception in the twenty-first century.

Course number: HSCI-271
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Neuroscience of Imagination

3

Seeing, visualizing, and dreaming are closely related: they are all perceptual experiences. In this course we will explore what is known about visual imagination (visualizing), as the neurological mechanisms of visual imagination offer a foundation for comparing it to other visual experiences. As often in neurology, we can learn from brain scan and brain lesion studies, allowing for examination of both normal visualizing and its disorders. Psychological studies investigate the role of visualizing and like other forms of imagination in cognition; as visualizing is a private experience, we will look at phenomenological analyses and compare them with our own first-person knowledge. Finally, we will explore what happens when we externalize visualizing in the forms of sketching, drawing, or painting.

Course number: HSCI-330
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

OAS Centennial Campaign

The Organization of American States (OAS) is the world's oldest regional platform for political dialogue and collective action in the Americas, actively promoting values of peace, democracy and justice throughout North, Central, and South America, and is celebrating its centennial in 2010 with a year-long series of cultural events and communications. This TDS studio, led by a team of graphic design, film and motion graphics faculty will focus on the branding of the centennial for broad public dissemination internationally, and will explore digital, motion and print vehicles that will capture this important moment in the organization's history with a contemporary appeal. Students will conceie an integrated multi-media campaign for the OAS Centennial that will receive extensive international visibility in next year's celebration. Petitons approved by GPK dept

Course number: TDS-309
Prerequisite: n/a

Ocean Science

3

This class is designed to be an interesting introduction to ocean science, developing in students a deeper understanding of our planet's largest feature, its origin and its uniqueness, plus investigating the ocean as a significant influence on our everyday lives. Students will learn about the sensitive interconnectedness between delicate biological balances and physical driving forces, as well as the life-style choices we make that profoundly impact the ocean. This course is for the student who is curious about the ocean, yet who may have little or no formal background in science.

Course number: HSCI-222
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

P&G Sustainable Hair Care

Create a sustainable vision for hair care. Restrictions: Graphic Design, Advertising, Product Design, Environmental Design; upper term students only by petition

Course number: TDS-310
Prerequisite: n/a

Pbs:

Course number: SAP-806
Prerequisite: n/a

Performance As Art

This course will take students through the theory of different acting styles such as Shakespearean Acting, Method Acting, Improvisational Acting, etc. Students will also study different actors, their highlights and WHY the acting performances are legendary.

Course number: HCRT-250
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Perpetual Motion: Moving City

This course will introduce new ways of understanding the modern city as a dynamic rather than static entity, focusing on how cities and regions are conceived, and how they function, thrive, move, and sometimes fail. Early suburban utopias, contemporary edge cities, squatter cities of the south, and the shrinking cities of the north will all be analyzed, always with an emphasis on mobility--or the lack of it. In short, this course will serve as a primer for the problems and challenges associated with the built environment and its integrated and overlapping systems that require great expense to be built, maintained, and changed.

Course number: HSOC-202
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Physical Anthropology

3

This course studies human biology within the framework of evolution with an emphasis on primates, primate behavior origins, leading to the 65 million years of ancestral human physiology as evidenced by the fossil record.

Course number: HSCI-210
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Physical Computing 1

3

The leading edge of design is becoming increasingly high tech. Microprocessors are enabling designers to incorporate both sophisticated behaviors and intelligent user interfaces into their products. This class will introduce students to a modern, low-cost microprocessor, the Arduino, and teach the core electronic sciences required to use it to control interactive design. This class assumes no prior knowledge of electronics, although students should have basic mathematical skills.

Course number: HSCI-214
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Physical Computing 2

This project-oriented class leads students through three open-ended, small-to-mid-scale design briefs in the context of the Arduino development environment. Students will explore interaction, environmental/ambient sensing strategies, and more complex digital electronics systems as a means to increase their understanding of contemporary approaches to electronics and computation. Simultaneously, students will learn strategies for seeing a project through from ideation to completion. Regular critiques will provide an opportunity for students to share their individual research with their colleagues as well as receive direct feedback from the instructor.

Course number: HSCI-232
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Plagues and Civilization

Over the course of the last 4,000 years, civilizations have risen and fallen because of disease. From the biblical plagues to the black death, from leprosy to AIDS, our diseases have defined us. Sometimes plagues have been anticipated, and sometimes they have swept down upon us unannounced and unexpected. Sometimes the result is personal suffering, and sometimes it is a total collapse of civilization. This class is an exploration of how societal practices create (and eliminate) diseases. We will start with the plague of Athens, which helped to destroy the Greek empire, and follow different diseases across both geography and time. In many cases, causes can be found for both the appearance and the disappearance of disease. This information will be of great value to any one who designs or plans for the urban environment.

Course number: HSOC-203
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Plagues and Civilization

3

Over the course of the last 4,000 years, civilizations have risen and fallen because of disease. From the biblical plagues to the black death, from leprosy to AIDS, our diseases have defined us. Sometimes plagues have been anticipated, and sometimes they have swept down upon us unannounced and unexpected. Sometimes the result is personal suffering, and sometimes it is a total collapse of civilization. This class is an exploration of how societal practices create (and eliminate) diseases. We will start with the plague of Athens, which helped to destroy the Greek empire, and follow different diseases across both geography and time. In many cases, causes can be found for both the appearance and the disappearance of disease. This information will be of great value to any one who designs or plans for the urban environment.

Course number: HSCI-220
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Poetry Workshop

3

The oldest form of writing is poetry. Its ancient allure as a mode of expression is still strong, sometimes in spite of contemporary distractions from the kind of concentration that reading and writing poetry often requires. This course, which will be run like a workshop, will concentrate on the writing of poetry as a daily practice, where the various daily emotional, intellectual, and sensory experiences can be focused into forms that can allow raw experience to be synthesized into art. We will look into some forms (like haiku and sonnet) and methods (like collage, symbolism, narrative, lyric), and do some reading of poetries that exemplify those forms and methods.

Course number: HNAR-205
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Pop Culture & Queer Rep

Engaging with a range of practices - zines, YouTube posts, online discussion, web comics, music, TV and film - we explore queer representations in pop culture. We look at contested relationships between spectator and text, identity and commodity, realism and fantasy, activism and entertainment, desire and politics. We explore how queer artists and audiences transform traditional genres to queer society. Class topics include: (1) new paradigms of desire; 2) consumption practices of queer texts; 3) validation of queer lifestyles via media portrayal; 4) construction of sexual identities - commodified or authentic - via pop culture inclusion.

Course number: HSOC-312
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Pop Culture & Queer Rep

Engaging with a range of practices - zines, YouTube posts, online discussion, web comics, music, TV and film - we explore queer representations in pop culture. We look at contested relationships between spectator and text, identity and commodity, realism and fantasy, activism and entertainment, desire and politics. We explore how queer artists and audiences transform traditional genres to queer society. Class topics include: (1) new paradigms of desire; 2) consumption practices of queer texts; 3) validation of queer lifestyles via media portrayal; 4) construction of sexual identities - commodified or authentic - via pop culture inclusion.

Course number: HCRT-312
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Presentation & Career Prep

3

This course concentrates on the transition you will ultimately make from a student to a business professional, emphasizing the need for strong presentation skills and giving you the confidence to promote your ideas coherently and convincingly. Classes are designed to address the real world issues you will encounter as you present your portfolio, go on job interviews, negotiate salaries, interview for freelance assignments, network, pitch your concepts, and make proposals. You will participate in videotaped mock interviews with industry professionals and gain the self-assurance necessary to organize, edit, and deliver effective business presentations.

Course number: HPRO-202
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Pro Practices for Artists

3

The pursuit of art today can sometimes seem like a capricious and daunting endeavor; there is clearly no one path or plan that serves all artists' aspirations or guarantees success. This course presents practical advice for artists that can aid in achieving the various satisfactions derived from a life in art. Some topics explored include: tools for documenting your achievements and assessing your objectives; choosing a graduate school; setting up a studio; putting together a professional portfolio and resume; project proposals and artist statements; foundations, grants, and artist-in-residence programs; legal issues, contracts, and copyrights; finances, accounting, and bookkeeping; art sales, representation, and galleries; critics, curators, and collectors; art teaching and academia; and what skills you will need for various art-related employment options. Class discussions will also touch on how best to deal with the inevitable challenges of being a working artist--pressures, motivation, competition, and rejection. This course will present an overview of the numerous opportunities that exist today for artists, and strategies for accomplishing your dreams.

Course number: HBUS-320
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Professional Pract. Internship

Course number: HPRO-900
Prerequisite: n/a

Professional Practice 1 (IxD)

In this class students learn how the practice of interaction design engages other designers, business/marketing professionals, artists, and technologists across various disciplines. Student will learn how to effectively strategize, communicate and develop their ideas for social and business entrepreneurship, consulting and studio sectors. Practical exercises in pitching, portfolio development, designing communication collateral and working with clients prepare students for professional practice. Visiting guest and studio visits will cover topics such as intellectual property, venture capital and social innovation.

Course number: HPRO-260
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Professional Practice 2 (IxD)

Building on Professional Practice 1 for Interaction Design, this class supports and guides students as they develop their own portfolio, professional direction and communication skills.

Course number: HPRO-310
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Professional Presentation

3

This class will begin preparing students for the presentation of their work and of themselves as professional photographers. Students will make a variety of presentations, speaking about their own work, the work of other artists, and on other topics as well. The class will develop research and speaking skills, begin the practice of constructive critique, and explore the variety of venues and new media for presenting work to prospective clients and the public.

Course number: HPRO-200
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Project-Writing Workshop

3

An advanced writing workshop that offers the time, structure, support, and rigor it takes to complete an ambitious writing project. Each participant is responsible for: 1) achieving substantial progress on a writing/making project (i.e. the first issue of a magazine, a web comic, an illustrated cookbook, a short story collection, a 'zine, a choose-your-own-adventure e-book, a graphic novel, or something else entirely) they commit to on the first day of class, and 2) contributing to their classmates' progress through thoughtful reading and critique. Student projects may be personal, or concurrently assigned in another class; the latter will require signed permission from the studio instructor. Collaborative projects between several enrolled students may also be acceptable, as long as the writing is divided evenly and in a way that supports the logic of the proposed project. In this course, the instructor is also a participant, writing and workshopping her own project at the pace the class collectively determines is appropriate for the range of projects proposed on the first day.

Course number: HNAR-300
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Properties Art Materials Wkshp

0

This workshop is an opportunity to ask questions and get answers on the materials you use in painting and drawing. Students are encouraged to bring in examples of what they are working on and not only get information on the best tools for the task, but also on their safety and permanency. Available to all students on a first come, first served basis. No appointment or registration necessary.

Course number: HHUM-003
Prerequisite: n/a

Properties Artistic Materials

3

The information in this class is as vital to a practicing artist as knowledge of surgical instruments and pharmaceuticals are to a surgeon. We will explore the physical and chemical properties of artists' materials, both common and uncommon, and how to select the right tools for the job. We will cover fine art, graphic art, and illustration materials: drawing materials, painting materials and mediums, pigments, electronic print media, papers and boards, canvases and supports, brushes, framing and storage, how to avoid creating art that self-destructs, and most importantly, how to protect yourself from exposure to hazardous materials.

Course number: HSCI-218
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Queer Studies

Introduces key concepts, theories and debates in queer studies; the course bridges a history of queer studies with contemporary social and cultural developments. We consider why queer theorists regard sexuality as socially constructed and focus on queer theorists' attempt to challenge heteronormative notions of "gender," "sex" and "sexuality." We discuss the concept of gender performativity, the impact of patriarchy and the position of transgender people vis a vis the queer community and pop culture. We trace the relationship between gay pride and shame and consider the role of the western model of gay identity in transnational queer and gender struggles. As a class group, we form an interpretive community to reconcile queer texts with issues of gender, race, sexuality and class that are pressingly current. We examine contemporary queerness and its relation to design, literature, film, culture and society.

Course number: HCRT-311
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Queer Studies

Introduces key concepts, theories and debates in queer studies; the course bridges a history of queer studies with contemporary social and cultural developments. We consider why queer theorists regard sexuality as socially constructed and focus on queer theorists' attempt to challenge heteronormative notions of "gender," "sex" and "sexuality." We discuss the concept of gender performativity, the impact of patriarchy and the position of transgender people vis a vis the queer community and pop culture. We trace the relationship between gay pride and shame and consider the role of the western model of gay identity in transnational queer and gender struggles. As a class group, we form an interpretive community to reconcile queer texts with issues of gender, race, sexuality and class that are pressingly current. We examine contemporary queerness and its relation to design, literature, film, culture and society.

Course number: HSOC-311
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Queer Voices Across Lit Genres

3

More than ever, voices of queer-identified authors exist as resistance to erasure. We will read contemporary fiction, memoir and poetry, in graphic, prose and lyric formats that deal with queer contexts, self and survival, identity, and intersectionality. Inevitably this class will touch on topics related to sex, identity, history, erasure, violence and politics. This class asserts trans personhood and respects preferred pronouns.

Course number: HNAR-318
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Race and Racism

3

Current events make race and racism hard to ignore. This course takes a hard look at the history and present of race and racism in the Americas. We will ask a lot of questions - how is race socially constructed and experienced? What realities are created by the idea of race? What might racial justice look like? This class is not for the faint of heart; we will delve deeply into tough issues for which there are neither easy nor neat resolutions.

Course number: HSOC-207
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Radical Green

RADICAL GREEN: PROBING THE EXTREMES OF ENVIRONMENTAL THOUGHT This course is designed to introduce students to some of the more extreme environmental philosophies, ethical concerns, and underlying perceptions of "wilderness," "wildness," and "nature" that have developed over the past hundred years. From John Muir, Aldo Leopold, and early twentieth-century conservation movements, to Deep Ecology and Earth First!, the course will attempt to unpack, explore, and redefine the varied assumptions and foundations of the contemporary sustainability issue and the greening of our present culture. Through readings and discussion, students will gain an understanding of these past and present schools of thought, and their related environmental movements, that have fundamentally challenged and shaped our notions about the role of the human in nature. Through the cultivation of critical environmental thinking skills, students will begin to construct their own philosophical approach and work on a course project that builds on the body of knowledge obtained throughout the term.

Course number: HSCI-204
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Radical Green

This course is designed to introduce students to some of the more extreme environmental philosophies, ethical concerns, and underlying perceptions of "wilderness," "wildness," and "nature" that have developed over the past hundred years. The course will attempt to unpack, explore, and redefine the varied assumptions and foundations of the contemporary sustainability issue and the greening of our present culture. Through readings and discussion, students will gain an understanding of these schools of thought and their related environmental movements, which have fundamentally challenged and shaped our notions about the role of the human in nature. Students will begin to construct their own philosophical approach and work on a course project that builds on the body of knowledge obtained throughout the term.

Course number: HSOC-204
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Re-Boot Berlin Culture

Course number: SAP-857E
Prerequisite: n/a

Re-Boot Berlin H & S 2

Course number: SAP-857F
Prerequisite: n/a

Readings in Fine Art

Re-Viewing Postmodernism: From Appropriation to Identity Politics to the Public Sphere. Because theories and definitions of postmodernism have relied heavily on advances in the arts, this course will consider what is at stake with this designation for the fine arts themselves. Since the term "postmodern" denotes neither a style nor a cohesive critical theory in itself, this course is primarily a summary of the main threads that have come to be tied up in this historical knot. The course will proceed thematically, rather than strictly chronologically, by highlighting paradigmatic methodologies that have come to define postmodernism in the realm of visual culture. This will be achieved by a thorough study of the central critical texts on postmodernism. Ultimately, we will consider the ways these various political and theoretical debates have been taken up by practicing artists, thus blurring the boundaries between politics, theory, and praxis.

Course number: HNAR-321
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Rethinking Feminism & Identity

Rethinking Feminism & Identity (Frankenstein's Monster Among Others) "I'm a strange new kind of inbetween thing aren't I not at home with the dead not with the living" -Sophokles, Antigone (trans. Anne Carson) "24 September 2008: Ginger died this morning of kidney failure. She was eleven years old. She was a small, dainty, feral, tortoise shell Cape Cod cat who hung out in my yard and sunned herself on my doorstep, seducing me from a distance. Getting preggers and knowing a soft touch when she saw one, she adopted me in April 1998 in order to give her kids a home. She was a good stay-at-home mom and a good friend. She kept me alive through some very difficult times. I wish I could have done the same for her." -Adrian Piper, "Ginger: 1997-2008" "Some ejaculate does taste like celery, yes. However literature does not taste like anything." -Ariana Reines, Mercury Do we become, are we born, or are we constructed as women? What is the relevance of such a question in relation to any understanding of feminism now? Using several historical as well as recent texts (from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein to Hilton Als' White Girls, through works by Shulamith Firestone, Valerie Solanas, and Beatriz Preciado), we will consider the changing critical/theoretical dynamics of feminism-as a way of thinking/being/doing "between" bodies and species. Although, we have organized the course around the discipline of art and our examples-case studies-will be drawn from the last 40 years or so of art-making, we expect the dialogue produced in class to range over many disciplines (design, filmmaking, etc.) and socio-economic concerns (sexuality, gender, biopolitics, and ecology). We will want to address what feminism smells like, what it tastes like, and how it causes a stink. There will be weekly assignments, at least one cogent presentation, and a final critical paper required for all participants-in order to engage fully with the readings and visual materials presented. The class is open to Grad Art, MDP, and advanced undergraduates.

Course number: HHIS-425
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Roads

3

More than just connecting elements, roads divide and define landscape, become test cases for our relationships with speed and mobility, and structure travel narratives that range from ritual pilgrimage to the hitchhiker's opportunistic ramblings. While cities, towns, and buildings - even symbolic landscapes - fit within traditional assumptions about what makes a place and invests it with meaning, roads, because they are designed with movement in mind, provide an alternative to stasis and settlement. They're figures and systems more than places, and as such they have their own rules. This course will look at roads and highways as elements of narrative and infrastructure, exploring how they fit into contemporary discussions of movement and landscape drawn cultural studies, philosophy and systems organization. Topics covered will include speed, organization, nomads, dystopia and the picturesque. We will look at and discuss maps and historical sources, film, literature, painting and photography and try to understand what roads do and how we experience them.

Course number: HCRT-240
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Running Design Based Business

3

Thinking of starting a design driven business? What are the costs and opportunities of a niche market versus a mass-market product? How do factories think? How do engineers and development people think? How do marketing and sales people think? How do finance people think? How do investors and marketing partners think? Interested in cautionary tales and success stories from design entrepreneurs? This course focuses on the real world, daily experience of running a design driven business.

Course number: HENT-211
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Safe Agua, Develpmnt Smnr

With very strong partners, this is a unique opportunity for selected Safe Agua Colombia students to push the depth and pilot implementation of their projects. The previous Peru development seminar was an incredible educational experience for the ENV and Prod students involved, affording the chance to attend a NCIIA strategy-mapping workshop, and present to social innovation thought leaders at the NCIIA conference in San Francisco. The Seminar is what allowed both Balde a Balde and Giradora to move beyond the classroom, to garner $65k of grants, along with numerous Safe Agua awards, international lectures, and major publicity, and the creation of a new Social Enterprise lead by the students. The Spring 2014 Development seminar is a great opportunity to continue to push Safe Agua to make real world change. Objectives: _develop Safe Agua Colombia projects & prototypes _develop strategies for "think big / start small / grow fast" implementation _reach out to potential partners (Compartamos Colombia, etc) _writing essays for submission to awards & grants to support next stages of pilot testing and build international recognition _readings and research to support project development Enrollment by petition only.

Course number: HPRO-366
Prerequisite: n/a

Safe Agua: Research in Context

This course is a Humanities & Sciences co-requisite for the Safe Agua: Colombia project, designed to provide participating students with applied ethnographic research methods and fundamental social, economic, and political context for their fieldwork and design processes. Through a series of readings, activities, and discussions, students will gain a more comprehensive understanding of factors affecting water access and sanitation in the low-income settlements of Bogota, as well as the socio-political frameworks shaping water poverty in the Global South. Students will also develop a suite of ethical and reflective field research practices as part of their design process, and generate integrated visual, verbal, and written materials in response to their research experiences.

Course number: HSOC-366
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or Take TDS-366 HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Science & Sustainability

3

Over the next hundred years, mankind will find itself in a life or death race: can we develop the technology needed to achieve a sustainable society before we deplete the earth's resources or irrevocably damage the environment? This course will explore the science of sustainability, including topics such as climate change, alternative energy, relationships between poverty and sustainability, and the future of the car.

Course number: HSCI-250
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Science & Tech Trnsfr Credit

Course number: HSCI-TRNSFR
Prerequisite: n/a

Sciences of the Unseen

3

Science is often portrayed as an engine of unnatural desires and disasters. In reality, science is our best approach for answering fundamental questions about our world, questions of "why" and "how", explorations of unseen processes. Re-expressed as technology, science has enabled the magic of our modern world. So what exactly is science, and how can you use it in your own life and work? This class teaches hands-on techniques of scientific inquiry and how to apply them to investigating questions relating to your own professional practice.

Course number: HSCI-207
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Screenwriting

3

This course looks at the key elements that go into creating a successful screenplay, among them character, conflict, and three-act structure. Weekly writing exercises reinforce the information introduced in class, and film clips open up discussion about the good and the bad of screenwriting. Film business professionals who visit will add to students' knowledge base, and course take-aways.

Course number: HNAR-337
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Second Nature

3

Untamed, artificial, nurturing, destructive, endangered. How we see nature is always framed by culture; at some distance, as second nature to ourselves. This TDS examines all cultural representations of nature: the history of painted landscapes, photography, cinema, video art, design including architecture, and poetry and literature. The physical form of landscape will be considered as well, especially when it is culturally manipulated, as we find in gardens, earth works and sculpture. We will go on field trips to to study the local landscape, as a source of history and inspiration. The environment, economics, race, gender and sexuality will provide multiple lenses through which we view the horizon. We will additionally consider our own "wildness," however that may manifest. This class is a five hour studio TDS with an embedded H&S component. We will have lectures, seminar discussions, screenings, field trips and class critiques of student work. All departments and disciplines are accepted. Projects can be in any media. Participants will produce art or design projects for the class, including a midterm, a class exhibition, and a final. There will be readings for each topic, and short papers directed towards opening up discussions. Active participation in all class discussions is a substantial requirement towards the overall grade.

Course number: TDS-320
Prerequisite: Take HCRT-320

Second Nature

The Humanities & Sciences component of the Second Nature TDS will take an in depth view of the critical and historical traditions of nature. In particular we will consider the intertwined realities of nature and media that is landscape, ranging from gardens to Google Earth. Topics may include: enclosure, survey, decay, westerns, gender, agro industry, wasteland and biomimetics among others. Students will be expected to read and write each week in conjunction with their studio practice.

Course number: HCRT-320
Prerequisite: Take TDS-320 Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Shakespeare Plays & Films

William Shakespeare is famous, but surprisingly, few Art Center students are familiar with his work--even though his plays are among the most important examples of the possibilities of narrative and drama, of character development, of psychological explorations, and of the dynamism of politics as it intersects history. Besides, the plays are exciting, funny, tragic, and incredibly entertaining. They just require some getting used to, and that is one of the goals of this course. During the semester we'll read two to four plays and see various film productions of each. We'll look into the plays as works of literature, and we'll explore the interpretations given to each play by actors and directors (to say nothing of editors, production designers, and others) as the literary genre is realized as drama. This course is of particular relevance to students in Film, Entertainment Design and Illustration. There will be a short exam on each play and an essay due at the end of the term. There may also be surprise guests.

Course number: HNAR-290
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Short Story

3

Students will learn a variety of short story techniques, including interior/dramatic monologue, letter narration, diary narration, memoir or observer narration, biography or anonymous narration, single character point of view and dual character/multiple character/no character point of view, with the goal of writing at least one finished short story during the term.

Course number: HNAR-301
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Silkscreen and Silk Painting

Cal Tech course via exchange program

Course number: CAL-061B
Prerequisite: n/a

Silkscreen and Silk Painting

Cal Tech course via exchange program

Course number: CAL-061A
Prerequisite: n/a

Social Science Transfer Credit

Course number: HSOC-TRNSFR
Prerequisite: n/a

Start-Up 1.0: Venture

3

In this course students will gain an understanding of how to launch a start-up venture and what it takes to succeed. They will learn how design entrepreneurs can leverage their talent into success, partnerships, and pitch for funding. Students will use the Business Canvas Model as a foundation to develop their start-up and create customer development through real world testing and feasibility. Students can use product designs, character based brands, online solutions and other ideas.

Course number: HENT-200
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Sustainability:impact/Strategy

3

Sustainability: Impact & Strategies aims to develop ecologically literate and globally-minded creative thinkers, able to facilitate our shared stewardship of the earth through art and design practice. The class will introduce categories of impact as parts of an interconnected system that has sustainability at its core. Environmental, economic, and social impact 'hot spots' will be presented for class discussion and analysis. Students will become familiar with strategies, such as so-called 'best practices,' that offer a means of addressing these impacts. In addition, students will experiment with concepts that are thought to encourage innovation and invention, such as bio-inspiration, radical simplicity, and new economic systems including product take-back and the materials economy, and the circular, sharing and networked economies. Particular skills will be emphasized and practiced: research, life cycle and systems thinking, critical evaluation and measurement, and the ability to clearly communicate complex information and ideas.

Course number: HSOC-220
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Sustainability:impact/Strategy

3

Sustainability: Impact & Strategies aims to develop ecologically literate and globally-minded creative thinkers, able to facilitate our shared stewardship of the earth through art and design practice. The class will introduce categories of impact as parts of an interconnected system that has sustainability at its core. Environmental, economic, and social impact 'hot spots' will be presented for class discussion and analysis. Students will become familiar with strategies, such as so-called 'best practices,' that offer a means of addressing these impacts. In addition, students will experiment with concepts that are thought to encourage innovation and invention, such as bio-inspiration, radical simplicity, and new economic systems including product take-back and the materials economy, and the circular, sharing and networked economies. Particular skills will be emphasized and practiced: research, life cycle and systems thinking, critical evaluation and measurement, and the ability to clearly communicate complex information and ideas.

Course number: HSCI-252
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Sustainable Bldg Pract for Env

3

Environmental designers have increasingly been called upon to work with sustainable building practices by the client, the investor, and the commissioner. As a result, choices in material availability, energy type, water usage, water drainage, and fabrication methods have evolved, and new trends in environmental products and spatial designs have developed. This course will provide a historical overview of sustainable design practices as they relate to vernacular architecture and spatial environments ranging from micro-scaled building forms and interiors to macro-scaled landscapes and exterior building skins. Students will research and analyze the sustainability factor for a number of case studies while building a vocabulary and understanding of trends in sustainable building practices. Students will furthermore evaluate sustainable building practices through a variety of tools, including the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for products and the USGBC LEED accreditation system for buildings and neighborhoods.

Course number: HSOC-283
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or Take ENV-254, Sustainability Studio HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Sustainable Bldg Pract for Env

Environmental designers have increasingly been called upon to work with sustainable building practices by the client, the investor, and the commissioner. As a result, choices in material availability, energy type, water usage, water drainage, and fabrication methods have evolved, and new trends in environmental products and spatial designs have developed. This course will provide a historical overview of sustainable design practices as they relate to vernacular architecture and spatial environments ranging from micro-scaled building forms and interiors to macro-scaled landscapes and exterior building skins. Students will research and analyze the sustainability factor for a number of case studies while building a vocabulary and understanding of trends in sustainable building practices. Students will furthermore evaluate sustainable building practices through a variety of tools, including the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for products and the USGBC LEED accreditation system for buildings and neighborhoods.

Course number: HSCI-254
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or Take ENV-254 HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

TAMA: Cultural Explorations

In conjunction with the Pacific Rim 8 Studio "Influencing Dining: California Lifestyle," this class will explore different cultural histories and relationships between art, design, and food in the social, political, and diverse cultural contexts of Los Angeles and the US. It will feature artists working with food ecologies, including: Leslie Labowitz and her Sproutime project, from 70s performance to a major organic food business; the social practice of L.A. collective Fallen Fruit; and the philosophy and aesthetics of Gordon Matta-Clark's FOOD restaurant in 1970s NYC. We will take two field trips: one to the Sunday morning service at the African-American AME Church, including a soul food meal; another to Latino East Los Angeles in conjunction with our examination of the politics and history of latinos and food production. We will also look at the Persian diaspora in LA and its culinary culture, show films and videos, and hold a special Thanksgiving Feast and discuss its evolution. Art Center's Pacific Rim students are encouraged to participate along with TAMA students.

Course number: HSOC-167
Prerequisite: n/a

TDS Evidence Books

A multi-disciplinary design and editing studio focused on producing an "Evidence Book," a record of students' process and experience during an Art Center TDS course, a demonstration of what these courses do and can do. During the first term the course is offered, we will produce the first of these books by refining a student-edited and -designed collaborative final project from Summer 2012's "Food TDS." This process will be used to establish an identity for a future, ongoing small-press book that can be printed on demand, and generate a functioning schedule and style guide to be made available to future TDS courses, so each can build a publication of their own Evidence Book into their syllabi. In coming terms, this course will produce new Evidence Books (with a goal of doing so for other TDS courses if they do not wish to do it themselves), plus adjust and update the established system as needed.

Course number: TDS-357
Prerequisite: n/a

TDS: Art Matters

The Art Matters trans-disciplinary studio recognizes the role of activist art endeavors that confront a range of social, environmental and political issues that can employ diverse art practices, including mass-media communication strategies, to promote dialogue and reflection: sometimes sounding alarms and calling for change. The course seeks to reinvent the space and expand the audience for art in the public sphere, as well as its place in the world beyond aesthetics and commerce. This class is structured as a TDS (studio and history design science). The class is a 6 unit class with two components that are co-requisite. The class meets for 8 hours with a break for lunch.

Course number: TDS-360H
Prerequisite: Take TDS-360

TDS: Avery Dennison

This studio will explore the future of space-saving organization systems for the Office Products division as well as the future of consumer experiences for the Retail Information Services division of Avery Dennison.

Course number: TDS-315
Prerequisite: n/a

TDS: Garden as Site

TDS: Garden as Site: Intersections of nature and culture in public space In this class we will explore the connections between art and gardens, between the cultivated and the wild. As a context for creative production, the garden is an alternative to the gallery, an open and varied framework that engages in different and challenging ways. We will look carefully at the many manifestations of garden and horticulture that have entered current cultural discourse, looking at contemporary art, artists, and designers who engage the garden and cultivation as a response to climate change, the politics of food and power, issues of public and private, the economy of art production, and the gallery system.

Course number: TDS-374
Prerequisite: n/a

TDS: Garden as Site

Humanities Component of Garden as Site: The Humanities component is designed to integrally support the objectives of the class, complimenting the major objectives in art or design work and the final projects and publication for the class. The Humanities faculty member will provide multiple in-class presentations addressing the history of various aspects of garden and landscape, will assign required readings, both for the class as a whole and individualized readings for particular projects, and will assist class participants with their written requirement for publication in the class journal. Additional short writing assignments will weave together reflections from course presentations, readings and personal research. Grading of the Humanities component of the class will be based on participants thoughtful and attentive participation in class discussions, presentations, required readings and written reflections, and the final text for the class journal. Con-current enrollment required: TDS-374 TDS: Gardens as Site.

Course number: HHIS-374
Prerequisite: Take TDS-374

TDS: INDY Racing League

Indianapolis Motor Speedway, in its first Funded Educational Project (FEP) at Art Center, will challenge students to imagine the future of the Indy Racing League (IRL). Students will have the opportunity to design a hallmark IndyCar for the future IRL and be asked to consider a variety of facets in the world of racing, from entertainment at the track and beyond to issues of sustainability. This transdisciplinary studio will engage experts in racing, engineering, fuel technology, etc. as advisors to help students gain a more intimate view of the driving experience and the possibilities for future technology. Ultimately, the design solutions should provide a preview of the overall, unique racing experience for an Indy Racing League fan in the year 2017 and position the new IndyCar as the core element.

Course number: TDS-347
Prerequisite: n/a

TDS: Narrative

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-341
Prerequisite: n/a

TDS: Sex

3

TDS: SEX explores sex as a powerful engine in art and culture, examining the construction of human sexuality, identity and gender; through the social, political and technological environments we live in. Topics include sex in art history, sex and capitalism, sex and censorship, pornography and social media, feminism and gender politics, and sex and the post-human. This course questions, creates, and generate discussions and projects that delve in to the direct and indirect language of sex, challenging us to confront how arresting, demented, theatrical and absurd it is now and in our near futures.

Course number: TDS-329
Prerequisite: n/a

TDS: Wrap

This trans-disciplinary studio will have the challenging task of producing a magazine as it's sole project. The content will be entirely independent and student driven. The magazine will ultimately be printed and given away at the Design conference, and all student work will be credited. There will also be an important online component of this project. While this class is open primarily to Graphic Design and Illustration majors, other disciplines are welcome. (Admission upon application.) Pre-requisite: Permission of the department for GD.

Course number: TDS-325
Prerequisite: n/a

TDS:Case Stdy InSocial Change

Course number: TDS-311
Prerequisite: n/a

TDS:Criticl Issues in Paintng

Painting is painting and there is no other medium that maintains such an important place in visual culture & human history. Investigate contemporay practices& current trends in local, national & global approaches to painting. Develop own work & participate in group critiques & classroom discus- sions.

Course number: TDS-340
Prerequisite: Take HUM-324

TDS:Mobile Health Outrch Clnc

Assist PCI, an international nonprofit based in San Diego with the roll-out of a new program for a health van that serves as a Mobile Health Care Clinic targeting high-risk communities in need of health care services and health education in Tijuana, Mexico. You will be proposing communication strategies on how to promote these services in the community as well as solutions to the vehicle146s functionality and operation. Designmatters will facilitate the studio team146s interface with PCI representatives and guest experts including healthcare personnel and will provide research and background on the target population, which will primarily include women and children. This studio will also include a funded field-trip to Tijuana and immersion in the field in order to assess and understand the needs of these communities. This is a unique opportunity to apply innovative design in support of health care access and community empowerment south of the border with outcomes of the studio to be implemented in the community by PCI and its partners.

Course number: TDS-327
Prerequisite: n/a

TDS:Painting in New York

This 14-week class includes a week in New York City with tours of the city's incomparable museums - The Metropolitan Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Frick, Niue Galleries, Whitney Museum of American Art, Guggenheim, and galleries in Chelsea area. The class size is limited.

Course number: TDS-348
Prerequisite: n/a

TDS:Redefing Chryslr Expernce

This spring Art Center College of Design and Chrysler will work together to develop a future vision for the "Chrysler Brand Culture". We will dive into the historic brand values of this leading company and craft an inventive and visionary Chrysler Experience. We will be developing a fresh look into the user connection on all levels. We will be looking at what a Showroom Experience can be in the twenty first century and define directions for where the opportunities are to develop an even stronger Chrysler Culture for the future. Our project will investigate the opportunities for defining not only the showroom experience, but traveling exhibitions, retail, merchandizing, co-branding and over-all brand direction development. Lead by Environmental design, with students from Graphics, Product, Advertizing and Environmental Design, we will explore, investigate, develop and define the new "Chrysler-Culture Experience.

Course number: TDS-314
Prerequisite: n/a

TDS:South Wing - 2030

The Province of South Holland has begun to redefine itself as a network of urban nodes defined by a common focus on knowledge industries, regional and global transport, and cultural treasures. Recently, the province has begun to focus on its most densely populated area, the "South Wing," which includes the city and port of Rotterdam, the second largest city in the Netherlands and the second largest port in the world, the Hague, the national capital, and Delft and Leiden, both historic city centers. After preliminary studies, the Province of South Holland has begun to make strategic proposals for how to brand the "South Wing." Working with a special design atelier within the Province of South Holland, the studio will conduct research on and make strategic branding proposals for the "South Wing" and how it might develop to the year 2030. We will focus on knowledge industries, regional and global transport, and cultural treasures, and on the cities of Rotterdam, the Hague and Delft. We will use scenario planning as our basic methodological research tool and make strategic proposals in the form of scenarios. These scenarios can take the form of websites, storyboards, animations, or small booklets. Ultimately, they will be published as part of the research for the Provincial Branding Study. In addition, we plan to publish a booklet here in the US.

Course number: TDS-344
Prerequisite: n/a

TDS:Text,Image & Written Word

This course is for advanced students, fifth term or higher, and has as its ultimate objective the production of a viable chapbook / zine. During the course of the semester, students will not only need to design and produce a book, but work with an editor and an author, read deeply into the text to find meaningful ways (as opposed to solely decorative ways) to graphically represent the text, and study the historical and literary ground from which the text comes as one way of discovering its meaning. In this way, we will begin to make solid connections between the graphic and the literary arts while embracing several departments, creating collaborative projects between writers and the practitioners of ACCD's various disciplines.

Course number: HNAR-316
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Take Product/Idea to Market

This course will help the student entrepreneur learn how to start a business, sell a product, find their customers, create a market strategy, figure out how management thinks, gauge financial risk and rewards, and attract resources. Successful startups require demanding execution measured against a careful plan and strategy. This is not a studio course that generates a product or idea: this course is for those entrepreneurs who have an existing product, service, or idea and now want to take it to the next level, to launch a business or sell a solution to an established company.

Course number: HENT-310
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

TestLab Berlin: H&S Elective

3

TestlabBerlin is a sponsored studio abroad project. One core faculty member will run the project for the entire semester, additionally there will be guest faculty/lecturers/guest critics in Berlin. Available to fifth term and above students by application. Students will experiment with new creative strategies for art & design production which will be informed by real-time response from a chosen audience. This feedback process will be enabled both through social media (Socialtecture) and through in-person interaction with the audience. The resulting projects are cross-cultural in nature and dramatically broaden the creative horizon of all participants.

Course number: HSAP-801A
Prerequisite: n/a

TestLab Berlin:Cultrl Immrsn

3

TestlabBerlin is a sponsored studio abroad project. One core faculty member will run the project for the entire semester, additionally there will be guest faculty/lecturers/guest critics in Berlin. Available to fifth term and above students by application. Students will experiment with new creative strategies for art & design production which will be informed by real-time response from a chosen audience. This feedback process will be enabled both through social media (Socialtecture) and through in-person interaction with the audience. The resulting projects are cross-cultural in nature and dramatically broaden the creative horizon of all participants.

Course number: HSOC-801A
Prerequisite: n/a

TestLab Berlin:German Lang

3

TestlabBerlin is a sponsored studio abroad project. One core faculty member will run the project for the entire semester, additionally there will be guest faculty/lecturers/guest critics in Berlin. Available to fifth term and above students by application. Students will experiment with new creative strategies for art & design production which will be informed by real-time response from a chosen audience. This feedback process will be enabled both through social media (Socialtecture) and through in-person interaction with the audience. The resulting projects are cross-cultural in nature and dramatically broaden the creative horizon of all participants.

Course number: HHUM-801A
Prerequisite: n/a

TestLab Berlin:HSOC Elective

3

TestlabBerlin is a sponsored studio abroad project. One core faculty member will run the project for the entire semester, additionally there will be guest faculty/lecturers/guest critics in Berlin. Available to fifth term and above students by application. Students will experiment with new creative strategies for art & design production which will be informed by real-time response from a chosen audience. This feedback process will be enabled both through social media (Socialtecture) and through in-person interaction with the audience. The resulting projects are cross-cultural in nature and dramatically broaden the creative horizon of all participants.

Course number: HSOC-801B
Prerequisite: n/a

TestLabBerlin-Cltrl Immersion

The Art Center Design Team that will be conducting on-site research and creating visionary concepts that focus on how people, goods and information may move and be experienced by Berlins Millennial generation 10 years in the future. Working in a Pop-up studio, interdisciplinary student teams will investigate historical, contemporary and future MOBILITIES to envision and create sustainable mobility scenarios for Berlins young professionals. Students will use the experience of living and working in Berlin as the platform for their investigations into a broad range of urban mobile lifestyles and into social, environmental, economic and political/regulatory practices around this topic. Students will learn how to use lifecycle assessment as part of their investigation. Research findings, field trips, guest lecturers and special guests will inform the creative process. As deliverables, the student teamswill produce content and media-rich future scenarios for urban mobility. To facilitate and enrich the design outcomes, the MOBILITIES 2022 Studio will run concurrently with a 5th term Transportation Design Studio at the Pasadena Campus. This Pasadena Team will partner with the Berlin Team to assist in concept development, prototyping and model making, collaborating to help turn the Berlin Teams proposals into sophisticated design solutions in digital and hard-model form. This and other TestLab sections will combine for 12 units of Studio credit and 6 units of Humanities and Design Sciences. Available to fifth term and above students by application.

Course number: SAP-856
Prerequisite: n/a

TestLabBerlin-Desgn Sustnblty

The Art Center Design Team that will be conducting on-site research and creating visionary concepts that focus on how people, goods and information may move and be experienced by Berlins Millennial generation 10 years in the future. Working in a Pop-up studio, interdisciplinary student teams will investigate historical, contemporary and future MOBILITIES to envision and create sustainable mobility scenarios for Berlins young professionals. Students will use the experience of living and working in Berlin as the platform for their investigations into a broad range of urban mobile lifestyles and into social, environmental, economic and political/regulatory practices around this topic. Students will learn how to use lifecycle assessment as part of their investigation. Research findings, field trips, guest lecturers and special guests will inform the creative process. As deliverables, the student teamswill produce content and media-rich future scenarios for urban mobility. To facilitate and enrich the design outcomes, the MOBILITIES 2022 Studio will run concurrently with a 5th term Transportation Design Studio at the Pasadena Campus. This Pasadena Team will partner with the Berlin Team to assist in concept development, prototyping and model making, collaborating to help turn the Berlin Teams proposals into sophisticated design solutions in digital and hard-model form. This and other TestLab sections will combine for 12 units of Studio credit and 6 units of Humanities and Design Sciences. Available to fifth term and above students by application.

Course number: SAP-855
Prerequisite: n/a

Testlab Berlin: PRP

TestlabBerlin is a sponsored studio abroad project. One core faculty member will run the project for the entire semester, additionally there will be guest faculty/lecturers/guest critics in Berlin. Available to fifth term and above students by application. Real-life design challenge in a studio setting. Project is funded by Art Center and supplemented by a consortium of outside partners.

Course number: SAP-828D
Prerequisite: n/a

The 1960s: A Cultural History

An interdisciplinary exploration of the period from 1958-1972 - a revolutionary turning point in 20th century American culture, and how it laid the foundation for many of the current and future issues of the 21st century including media and technology, ecology and sustainability, and designing the future. This class about a series of events in time and space in the mid twentieth century in which a number of forces- political, social, cultural, technological, environmental, perceptual, intellectual, and generational - interface, collide, overlap, combust, fuse, and fracture. Some might say that the 60s actually begins in 1956 in Little Rock, Arkansas. Others might say it is with the election of John F. Kennedy in 1960, or more accurately with his assasination in November 1963. Likewise, it can be seen as coming to an end with either the election or the resignation of Richard M. Nixon 1974. Or ultimately, with the final departure from Vietnam in 1973. For many, 1968 was the the fork in the road, the place where the timeline split, the year in which possibilities for a different future were irrevocably lost, and the course of the future we are now living with was determined. The prologue and the epilogue are just as crucial to understanding the period as the hard lines of a numerical chronology. Thus it is best seen and understood through a series of transparent "maps" of the various terrains, laid one over the other, and the mindsets that shaped and altered them. As a seminar style class incorporating the visual and performing arts, literature, television, film, fashion, advertising, design, social and political movements, science and technology, we.will examine, analyze, and compare the diverse cultural output of the 1960s with critical insight into the creative, political, and social dynamics of the era, and its relevance to our current time and issues. Timelines and interdisciplinary presentation projects. Learning objectives/outcomes 1- To have a greater knowledge of the culture of the 60s, and its application to our present cultural environment, with a comprehension of the deeper meaning of innovative, experimental, and revolutionary thinking and creative concepts and processes within that context, and be able to apply it to future work. 2- An in-depth understanding of the complex interface between the avant-garde arts, communications media, and design within the larger social and political framework, and the ability to analyze, critique, and connect to contemporary issues. 3- The ability to raise questions about ethical issues and social consequences in media, the arts, design, technology, and how to apply that to current and future practice. 4 - Increased visual and cultural literacy and a greater awareness of its importance to the world social and political environment and the role of citizen designer in 21st century.

Course number: HSOC-310
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

The Business of Licensing

3

For artists and designers who want to spend most of their time creating and less of their time on business issues licensing your work may be the right entrepreneurial career path for you. This course teaches the entire licensing process from putting together a licensing property, portfolio or program, picking the right licensors for your work, creating a licensing proposal and presentation, negotiating the deal, to managing successfully licensed artwork and products. Key creative content covered in the class include illustration, photography, graphic design, inventions, new products, new services, entertainment properties, character brands, print and digital publishing, brand licensing, and children's properties. Throughout the class each student will work on their own licensing project and strategy and create a final written proposal and presentation.

Course number: HENT-210
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

The Design Professional

3

Communicating Your Professional Identity. Learn to represent yourself and your ideas clearly and confidently in a professional working environment. This course is ideal for those applying for internships or organizing job searches and interviews following graduation. Students will refine their resume and business correspondence to reflect their individual competitive strengths, as well as enhance communication skills as they relate to presentations, meetings, networking, and interviews. Additional topics include: personal positioning strategy, online presence, professional etiquette, compensation, and mentors. Guest lecturers with expertise in targeted areas of interest will be invited to share their experiences and review portfolios, and as time permits, field trips to local design groups may be scheduled.

Course number: HBUS-200
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

The Dream

3

This is a multi-disciplinary class about dreams, focusing on the science of sleep and dreaming, the structure of dreaming, and the way "dream logic" informs the work of writers, artists, and filmmakers. Students will learn about the physiology of sleep and sleep disorders, and about the neurology and phenomenology of dream content. We will discuss earlier ways of analyzing content (Freud), as well the contemporary scientific understanding of the narrative structure of dreams. We'll also see how artistic works can be accessed through the same methods that can be used in making meaning in dreams. Dreams create a sense or experience of meaning: how artists translate these dream experiences into artistic expressions will be a continuing theme throughout the course.

Course number: HSCI-235
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

The Ecology of Fashion

Fashion is a way of thinking and doing that impacts all aspects of our lives. This experimental process-based interdisciplinary TDS workshop will explore fashion concepts, theories, materials, crafts, and new technologies as they can be applied to a design and communications practice as a whole. Students will be engaged in research, design, production, and critique. They will be encouraged to innovate with materials, explore environmental and social issues, create new markets, and aspire to a high level of craft and esthetic value. Issues of ecology, ethics and sustainability, as well as the politics of consumption, production, and conservation will be explored in relation to studio design assignments. The ecology of fashion includes narratives of identity and the role of presentation in social culture as part of design practice as well as esthetic and sensual pleasure, tactile desire, decoration, fantasy, glamour. The 5 hour class will combine both studio and seminar and include fashion history and theory.

Course number: TDS-335
Prerequisite: n/a

The Evolution of Civil Rights

In this class we will cover what are your rights as an individual, as a member of a group, and even more specifically as an artist, designer and/or author. We will look at how these rights are articulated in the law and in social practice, and will look at how we got those rights. Guest lecturers, films and music will help us see how art, music, literature, poetry and activism lead to obtaining these civil rights. We'll also look at the threats and limitations to these rights in courts, in cities, in the workplace and in public and in private. As part of our discussions we will talk about civil rights in other countries and the current struggles around the world, and of course, at home. Course assignments will include reading articles, choices of books and poetry, watching and reviewing movies, listening to music from the formation of the United States until now all on the topic of defining, fighting for, defending and protecting the rights of individuals, minorities and groups in public and in private.

Course number: HSOC-330
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

The Factory of Experience

The Factory of Experience Political and Micropolitical Ecologies of the City Are subjects as products of the city as much cities are products of subjects? This course will examine dialogic forces that coexist in the creation and transformation of the city: the production of space via urban planning at city level and the adaptation processes of space performed by groups and individuals at a local level. Cycles of rise and decay of urban areas, and the ever changing vitality of the city dwellers produce effects on each other: space produces bodies while bodies produce space. The Factory of Experiences is a space for divergent thinking on how urban processes shape human behaviors and more specifically, creative processes such as art and design. Through urban sociology, critical theory, visual studies, philosophy and art theory, the course will study practices that address the experience of living, working, creating and dissenting in the city and by means of the urban space. There will be lectures, site visits and walking tours during the semester as a complement to the seminar and discussion sessions.

Course number: HCRT-304
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

The Factory of Experience

The Factory of Experience Political and Micropolitical Ecologies of the City Are subjects as products of the city as much cities are products of subjects? This course will examine dialogic forces that coexist in the creation and transformation of the city: the production of space via urban planning at city level and the adaptation processes of space performed by groups and individuals at a local level. Cycles of rise and decay of urban areas, and the ever changing vitality of the city dwellers produce effects on each other: space produces bodies while bodies produce space. The Factory of Experiences is a space for divergent thinking on how urban processes shape human behaviors and more specifically, creative processes such as art and design. Through urban sociology, critical theory, visual studies, philosophy and art theory, the course will study practices that address the experience of living, working, creating and dissenting in the city and by means of the urban space. There will be lectures, site visits and walking tours during the semester as a complement to the seminar and discussion sessions.

Course number: HSOC-304
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

The Films of India

This course is a comprehensive meta-generic study of the world's largest producers of films, India. The purpose of study is to consider the development of world cinema as well as examine topics of colonialism to globalization facing the nation, its varying regions, the world and the individual. Topics include an examination of India's film history paralleling European cinema of the 20th ca. and its development of genres, and following up to today's hyper-production of the mirror Hollywood imaging Bollywood. Issues facing the individual, gender and the multi-culture within will be considered as the country was colonized, and then how the country moved away from that space into achieving their own identity. In addition, we will study the new challenges and conflicts the country faced over the decades after independence and how it continues to play a vast role in the globalizing world. Some of the filmmakers we will study include Satyajit Ray, Ritwik Ghatak, Shyam Benegal, Mani Kaul, Mira Nair and Adoor Gopalakrishnan. In addition, the course will examine films of India's relationship to literature, art, and other cultural elements of India as it is explored in the variety of films selected. Along with lectures, the class will view and discuss a precise curation of India's films. Discussions, readings and research papers are organized to develop the student's interests in visual culture alongside their own developing visual production.

Course number: HNAR-341
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

The Films of Woody Allen

3

This course is an auteur study of the films of Woody Allen focusing on his strong background in writing with broad and heavy dialogues set in film learning environments. The course will investigate writing and its translations and interpretations into film environments circling the political, social and psychological meanderings of the last 60 years. Nihilism, cynicism, sarcasm and jokes, how are they intertwined with our observations as individuals facing our complicated worlds. The course will outline and discuss comedic structures used in film as seen in this filmogrpahy but will circumference historical comedic structures. A chronological selection of films will be viewed representing categories and interests that parallel Allen's film history. Discussions, readings and research papers are organized to develop the students interests in visual culture and understanding their involvement in their world with their own cultural production.

Course number: HNAR-347
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

The Graphic Novel

A close examination of the group of texts loosely labeled "graphic novels," in which verbal and visual language come together on the page toward a literary effect. Through study of comics and graphic novels themselves plus a number of critical texts--which examine comics development over time, and how they function both physically and thematically--this course investigates comics' specialized language and the possibilities of narrative in a medium so open, for a number of reasons, to experimentation.

Course number: HNAR-382
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

The Heroine

In the age of speculative-fiction trilogies and dystopian movie franchises, let us take a closer look at The Heroine, that female protagonist as old as Isis. We'll read the female protagonist, paying attention to the traditional hero cycle, tropes and types, as well as departures from these. We may re-discover forgotten leading ladies and meet new ones.

Course number: HNAR-302
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

The Lab:sciences of the Unseen

The focus of this class will be about how to ask and scientifically answer questions about physical phenomena and to show how these techniques can be applied to your design practice. Scientists answer questions by taking a big idea and distilling it down to simple questions that can be explored via experimentation. There are two broad categories of science: confirmatory and exploratory. Confirmatory science tests a particular hypothesis, whereas exploratory science searches for a hypothesis. Final projects will seek to test or explore a question related to your practice.

Course number: HSCI-331
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

The Piazza: Cnvrsatnl Italian

3

In Summer 2017, Humanities and Sciences is offering semester in Italy, a condensed, 15 credit, multi-disciplinary series of courses, anchored in the city of Modena. Students will be immersed in Italian culture, as their course work uses the piazza (town square) as a lens through wich the idea and reality of The City may be studied.

Course number: HHUM-803B
Prerequisite: n/a

The Piazza: Fractal in Nature

3

In Summer 2017, Humanities and Sciences is offering semester in Italy, a condensed, 15 credit, multi-disciplinary series of courses, anchored in the city of Modena. Students will be immersed in Italian culture, as their course work uses the piazza (town square) as a lens through wich the idea and reality of The City may be studied.

Course number: HSCI-803A
Prerequisite: n/a

The Piazza: H&S Elective

3

In Summer 2017, Humanities and Sciences is offering semester in Italy, a condensed, 15 credit, multi-disciplinary series of courses, anchored in the city of Modena. Students will be immersed in Italian culture, as their course work uses the piazza (town square) as a lens through wich the idea and reality of The City may be studied.

Course number: HSAP-803B
Prerequisite: n/a

The Piazza: H&S Elective

3

In Summer 2017, Humanities and Sciences is offering semester in Italy, a condensed, 15 credit, multi-disciplinary series of courses, anchored in the city of Modena. Students will be immersed in Italian culture, as their course work uses the piazza (town square) as a lens through wich the idea and reality of The City may be studied.

Course number: HSAP-803A
Prerequisite: n/a

The Piazza: Writing the City

3

In Summer 2017, Humanities and Sciences is offering semester in Italy, a condensed, 15 credit, multi-disciplinary series of courses, anchored in the city of Modena. Students will be immersed in Italian culture, as their course work uses the piazza (town square) as a lens through wich the idea and reality of The City may be studied.

Course number: HHUM-803A
Prerequisite: n/a

Theory of Structure

3

This course offers a survey of the role of structure as a foundation of successful design. As a practical concept, structure embraces many design parameters: form, function, cost, durability, and manufacturability. From a theoretical standpoint, however, understanding and predicting how these parameters interact requires knowledge of details from the disparate fields of physics, engineering, materials science, and history, among others. This course will explore these complex relationships by introducing definitions, methods, and analytical techniques complimented by a more historical perspective on the function of structure. Case studies in the lessons of structural failure will illustrate how cutting-edge design must, at times, balance on a knife's edge, and how such daring might be safely and dependably accomplished in the future.

Course number: HSCI-205
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Toys & the Childlike in Art

This interdisciplinary humanities course addresses the psychological, sociological, artistic, literary, theoretical, and design-related aspects of toys. Since the images of toys and children pervade the media, advertisements, commercials, and the art of the present, it is important to study and re-evaluate the concept of childhood, the childlike, play, and the emerging new character of our culture. The class will help students understand toys in the context of recent and current cultural context, and will connect to certain studio practices - from toy design to fine art practices. Students in a variety of design disciplines can benefit from this course, too, exploring the wider cultural world of products. Textbook: Neil Postman: The Disappearance of Childhood, New York: Vintage Books, 1994.

Course number: HCRT-208
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Toys & the Childlike in Art

This interdisciplinary humanities course addresses the psychological, sociological, artistic, literary, theoretical, and design-related aspects of toys. Since the images of toys and children pervade the media, advertisements, commercials, and the art of the present, it is important to study and re-evaluate the concept of childhood, the childlike, play, and the emerging new character of our culture. The class will help students understand toys in the context of recent and current cultural context, and will connect to certain studio practices - from toy design to fine art practices. Students in a variety of design disciplines can benefit from this course, too, exploring the wider cultural world of products. Textbook: Neil Postman: The Disappearance of Childhood, New York: Vintage Books, 1994.

Course number: HSOC-208
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-317
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-326
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-343
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-349
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-345
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

See Comments in Section

Course number: TDS-322
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-303
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-312
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-302
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

See Comments in Section

Course number: TDS-324
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-304
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-346
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-305
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-321
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

See Comments in Section

Course number: TDS-323
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-313
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-306
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-307
Prerequisite: n/a

Transdisciplinary Course

Each "section" will have a unique description under "additional info"

Course number: TDS-328
Prerequisite: n/a

Transportation Histories

3

This course will examine transportation as a multi-dimensional activity with historical, social, political, economic, and environmental importance. The class structure will consist of seminar-style engagements, critical examination of relevant literature and media, writing and analysis, and planned field trips. The curriculum has been organized chronologically and thematically to engage students in a discussion of the various modes of transport, by land, water, and air, as indispensible in the production of culture. The students will investigate the role transportation has played in the rise of civilizations, development of societies, as well as nation building, national unity, and individual identity. Also examined will be transportation as a factor both shaping economic activities and being shaped by them, and the environmental costs of transportation will be addressed in terms of current sustainability concerns.

Course number: HHIS-282
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

True West: Works-Sam Shepard

Sam Shepard's plays, films, and prose have made him an inimitable, iconic figure in our cultural landscape. His theater pieces famously mine concepts of masculinity and the American west. Often set in the towns and deserts on LA's periphery, they explore contemporary themes including Cowboy Mouth's drug-addled, 1960s bohemia; The Tooth of Crime's paranoid, suicidal quest for rock 'n roll fame; Curse of the Starving Class's tragi-comic, suburban family dysfunction; True West's desperate, Hollywood-fueled sibling class war; Buried Child's twisted, hinterland incest; Fool for Love's catch-22 heartbreak; and A Lie of the Mind's public and self deception. The prose of Motel Chronicles, Cruising Paradise, Great Dream of Heaven, and Day of Days delves into these and other issues in a more personal way as Shepard uses accessible-yet-poetic descriptions to tell powerfully concise stories. This course asks students to write responses to, and present explications of, the week's play, film, or short-story cluster. They'll also be asked to produce a final project marrying short format writing with a piece of visual work in a medium of their choosing.

Course number: HNAR-230
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Type + Authorship

On day one students conjure, discuss, and write their way into a book of collective thematic interest. We then create and curate a supporting archive of suggested texts, images, film as research around the theme to find an editorial tone for the publication. Every week through the course of the first month we write deeper and fine-tune. Then the drawing begins. This class functions as a multi-disciplinary studio environment to draw, photograph, illustrate, and graphically impregnate a ripe topic (like hair, animals, the encyclopedia). It's about speed and follow-through, dedication to an idea. Writing in class, writing at home, rewriting, editing, analyzing. Developing new collaborative skills and trust. Students not only produce original writing and images but also learn how to work with secondary writing like a preface, captions, titling, colophon, marginalia; how to curate an overall tone for content; how to construct a narrative sequence; how to copy edit and proof. All read selected works out loud in a final crit.

Course number: HNAR-365
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Unfold and Display

The notion of place dominates many discourses around exhibition-making, as well as how the ideas of the artists and the behavior of the audience are shaped. Authors like Tony Bennett and Wendy Shaw have focused on how the exhibition space is created and regulated, while Lucy Lippard and Seth Siegelaub experimented with ephemeral, portable and dematerialized exhibitions. These histories will serve as a platform to study and experiment practices of displaying that privilege the destruction of the exhibition space as a stable form: printable exhibitions, soundscapes, exhibition ephemera and books-as-exhibitions, are examples of how curatorial practice transforms to cope with new urgencies, materialities, temporalities and dimensions of artistic practice. 'Unfold and Display' will be a seminar and a laboratory for curatorial experimentation, where students will meet, interact and propose ways of unfolding and displaying, moving beyond the walls and responding to temporal, political, discursive and economic constraints. We will deal with limitations as potentiality for creative engagement with exhibition practices.

Course number: HHIS-350
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Unfold and Display

The notion of place dominates many discourses around exhibition-making, as well as how the ideas of the artists and the behavior of the audience are shaped. Authors like Tony Bennett and Wendy Shaw have focused on how the exhibition space is created and regulated, while Lucy Lippard and Seth Siegelaub experimented with ephemeral, portable and dematerialized exhibitions. These histories will serve as a platform to study and experiment practices of displaying that privilege the destruction of the exhibition space as a stable form: printable exhibitions, soundscapes, exhibition ephemera and books-as-exhibitions, are examples of how curatorial practice transforms to cope with new urgencies, materialities, temporalities and dimensions of artistic practice. 'Unfold and Display' will be a seminar and a laboratory for curatorial experimentation, where students will meet, interact and propose ways of unfolding and displaying, moving beyond the walls and responding to temporal, political, discursive and economic constraints. We will deal with limitations as potentiality for creative engagement with exhibition practices.

Course number: HSOC-350
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Unfold and Display

The notion of place dominates many discourses around exhibition-making, as well as how the ideas of the artists and the behavior of the audience are shaped. Authors like Tony Bennett and Wendy Shaw have focused on how the exhibition space is created and regulated, while Lucy Lippard and Seth Siegelaub experimented with ephemeral, portable and dematerialized exhibitions. These histories will serve as a platform to study and experiment practices of displaying that privilege the destruction of the exhibition space as a stable form: printable exhibitions, soundscapes, exhibition ephemera and books-as-exhibitions, are examples of how curatorial practice transforms to cope with new urgencies, materialities, temporalities and dimensions of artistic practice. 'Unfold and Display' will be a seminar and a laboratory for curatorial experimentation, where students will meet, interact and propose ways of unfolding and displaying, moving beyond the walls and responding to temporal, political, discursive and economic constraints. We will deal with limitations as potentiality for creative engagement with exhibition practices.

Course number: HCRT-350
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Urban Anthropology

3

This course will introduce the study of cities and city life from an anthropological perspective (e.g., how people, from elites to prostitutes, survive in cities; how cities visually reflect globalization; how gangs and churches both help poor people survive). By the end of the course the students should be able to identify characteristics of cities cross-culturally and demonstrate an understanding of the interconnectedness between the institutions of urban life and the lives of city dwellers. The emphasis will be on cities as systems that guide our lives and our responses to them.

Course number: HSOC-110
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Urban Leviathans: Opulence

3

Urban Leviathans: Opulence, Struggle, and Squalor in the Majority World will explore 21st-century urban extremes, from the globalized metropolitan region to the almost schizoid characteristics of what we once called the "developing" or "third world" but must now refer to as the "majority world"--the fast-growing cities located in or situated near the 10/40 Window. This course will provide a wide range of understandings about the nature of "majority" cities including, but not limited to, a study of the ecological ramifications of urban growth, varied security issues, the complexities of urban life, and the politics of plunder keeping stable governments from taking hold. This course is important for Art Center students, because it can give them a better sense of the non-western city in a rapidly changing, globalized context; it should help students understand urban life and many of the political, ecological, and social struggles taking shape in this majority world that we often find easy to ignore.

Course number: HSOC-290
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Visual Anthropology

An examination of visual culture and its representation by anthropologists. The course will look at universal meanings behind common visual symbols as well as the main patterns of difference between types of cultures. Throughout the course, videos made by anthropologists about other cultures will show the history of change in representation and the meaning of exotic visual symbols to Western culture as a whole.

Course number: HSOC-111
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Visual Math

3

This course debunks topics usually called "mathematical" by revealing their use in other fields, with a particular focus on those concepts that have a visual bent (geometrical, cultural, textual). Lectures are each built around a concept drawn from the field of mathematics that connects to other subject areas: classical and modern visual arts, economics, science (astronomy, physics), music, optics (color, lenses), and numerical studies (infinities, "special" numbers, mystical preconceptions, "unexplainable" phenomena). A goal of the course is to demonstrate these manifold connections, but also to uncover that which is compelling about mathematical concepts; special attention is given to those concepts that have "unexplained beauty." All mathematical skill required for analytical techniques will be taught in the course.

Course number: HSCI-201
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

WS Placement

Course number: HWRI-WS
Prerequisite: n/a

WS:I Placement

Course number: HWRI-WSI
Prerequisite: n/a

Walking Cities

This course will examine diversity in the L.A. region from the perspective of cultural production including architecture, art, design, food, language, music, religion, and transportation. The class structure will consist of academic work, incorporating seminar-style engagements, critical examination of relevant literature, writing and analysis, planned field trips, creative manifestations of discoveries and insights, and critique. The curriculum has been organized into themes to engage students to develop a better understanding of cultural diversity and its influence on the community of L.A.

Course number: HSOC-250
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Wet Paint TDS

What's the significance of painting as an art? We'll begin by discussing it as a triangulated force-field: One corner comprises the intentions of the artist who creates the painting; a second comprises the expectations of the beholder who views the painting; and a third comprises the unique demands of paint itself. These three vertices are connected by a long history of painterly practice, punctuated by theoretical attempts to understand, promote, and exploit both painting and its practitioners. We'll explore these powerful connections in an attempt to discover the center (or centers) of the painting-triangle. Special emphasis will be placed on the state of painting today. Expect a substantial amount of academic homework. Students will be asked to read texts each week, write responses to what they read, integrate their thinking with their practice-and, above all, get wet. This Humanities & Sciences course is an integrated co-requisite to the Studio Wet Paint TDS. CO-REQUISITE: TDS-342

Course number: HCRT-342
Prerequisite: Take TDS-342 Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Women Filmmakers

3

This class is less a 'smash hits', historical survey of female directors and more of an examination of filmmakers who have a specific and idiosyncratic point of view. We will watch films and do some deep, critical thinking about the choices of the filmmakers. The goal being, you will learn tools, as artists, to develop your voice, your point of view. Each week we will watch a film and read an accompanying essay that ties into the film thematically. Some examples of the filmmakers and themes include: Leni Riefenstahl ("The Aesthetics of Fascism"), Ida Lupino ("Neorealist and Social Justice Champion"), Maya Deren and Marjorie Cameron ("Occult Influencers"). We will also study the films of Agnes Guy-Blache, the first female director in Hollywood who directed over 1000 films, but has largely been written out of film history. We will read essays by Pauline Kael and Susan Sontag among others. There will be class discussions where participation is mandatory. There will be writing too, both formal and informal. The goal is that you will learn how to watch films more carefully, communicate ideas effectively and develop your arguments persuasively.

Course number: HNAR-225
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Women in Film

Women in Film -- this course traces the depiction of women in American feature film, from the Golden Age of Cinema (such as George Cukor's "The Women" from 1939) to contemporary films with independent voices, prominent women filmmakers, and multi-cultural points of view. Films to examine include Michael Curtiz's "Mildred Pierce," Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds," Julie Dash's "Daughters of the Dust," Jane Campion's "The Piano," Kathryn Bigelow's "Zero Dark Thirty," and new films such as "Suffragette," "Carol," and "Star Wars: The Force Awakens." How and why have depictions changed? What do recent studies about women's participation in top-rated feature films tell us? These films will be viewed as powerful social and political expressions, and as cinematic art.

Course number: HCRT-230
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

World Hist/Digital Humanities

Digital archives and libraries across the world make available sources that have enhanced how we learn subjects and make things. In this course, students work collaboratively to build digital history exhibits on curated topics in 20th-century world history. To do digital history is to create a framework through technology for people to explore sources and follow a narrative on a historical problem. Students select exhibit topics from a list, and prepare for content development with general class readings in world history. A media designer will advise on interface concept. The final exhibits will have completed curatorial content, including texts and database of artifacts, and an interface sketch. No media production is required. This is a humanities/social sciences course with a design component.

Course number: HSOC-292
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

World Hist/Digital Humanities

Digital archives and libraries across the world make available sources that have enhanced how we learn subjects and make things. In this course, students work collaboratively to build digital history exhibits on curated topics in 20th-century world history. To do digital history is to create a framework through technology for people to explore sources and follow a narrative on a historical problem. Students select exhibit topics from a list, and prepare for content development with general class readings in world history. A media designer will advise on interface concept. The final exhibits will have completed curatorial content, including texts and database of artifacts, and an interface sketch. No media production is required. This is a humanities/social sciences course with a design component.

Course number: HHIS-292
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

World Histories

3

The course examines the major political, economic and social developments of the world from the beginnings of World War I to the present. The focus of lectures, readings and writing assignments will be on factors that contributed to the outbreak of World War I and World War II, and the issues that remained unresolved by these global conflicts. New challenges presented by these conflicts include the role of nationalism and socialism as political forces, the impact of Western imperialism on Africa and Asia, and the world's increasing economic interdependence.

Course number: HSOC-295
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

World Histories

3

The course examines the major political, economic and social developments of the world from the beginnings of World War I to the present. The focus of lectures, readings and writing assignments will be on factors that contributed to the outbreak of World War I and World War II, and the issues that remained unresolved by these global conflicts. New challenges presented by these conflicts include the role of nationalism and socialism as political forces, the impact of Western imperialism on Africa and Asia, and the world's increasing economic interdependence.

Course number: HHIS-295
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Writing About Art

The course is designed to help students develop a level of proficiency and confidence with tools for writing about art, especially their own.

Course number: HNAR-322
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Writing As Curatorial Practice

Artists and designers often curate an exhibition as a way of gathering and interpreting other's ideas and artworks around their own interests. Writing is the key to setting an exhibition in motion and in the act of writing, we grasp complex thoughts and explore hidden meanings. Curators-from research and proposals to packaging, exhibition texts, and catalogs-are writers. Through visits to alternative exhibition spaces, galleries, and studios with owners, publishers, curators, and artists, we will expand the notion of curated sites. In this class we develop writing as a tandem practice to your studio work. Students write reviews, curatorial statements, and narratives about work they experience, as well as study different styles of writing about art and cultural practice. Students create individual exhibition proposals as a means of engaging with newly discovered material and to cultivate their own artists voice. This three-hour seminar includes weekly readings, intensive writing, and field trips. All disciplines are encouraged to take this writing focused course (advertising, design, fine art, film, photography, illustration).

Course number: HNAR-317
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Writing Requirement

Psuedo course block

Course number: HWRI-102.PC
Prerequisite: Take HWRI-102 or HWRI-101

Writing Studio

3

This course is tailored to Art Center students and promotes fluency in the discourses of art and design as well as overall critical thinking skills. Most course readings address topics in art, design, or consumer culture. The assignments ask students to write in a range of contexts, make oral presentations, review grammar as needed, and build design-related vocabulary. Over the semester each student will complete a variety of exercises that support the writing and revision of three to four essays. The "intensive" version of the class provides additional support for student efforts with an extra two hour section each week.

Course number: HWRI-102
Prerequisite: n/a

Writing Studio: Intensive

3

This course is tailored to Art Center students and promotes fluency in the discourses of art and design as well as overall critical thinking skills. Most course readings address topics in art, design, or consumer culture. The assignments ask students to write in a range of contexts, make oral presentations, review grammar as needed, and build design-related vocabulary. Over the semester each student will complete a variety of exercises that support the writing and revision of three to four essays. The "intensive" version of the class provides additional support for student efforts with an extra two hour section each week.

Course number: HWRI-101
Prerequisite: n/a

Writing Tandem to Art & Design

3

Writing Tandem to Art & Design uses memoir, essays, reviews, and other non-fiction works as models for creating a voice for your practice. In this class you will develop writing as a tool to fuel your creative work. Weekly discussion and writing topics will include your own work and research interests, art an design sites and exhibits in the greater LA area, and responses to focused readings. We will read out loud in class together, break down the structure and prose of successful passages and edit work. By learning how to write for yourself in tandem with your creative practice, you will gain greater focus and a better understanding of your work, allowing you to better communicate your ideas to others. This course is open to artists and designers of all majors and areas of concentration.

Course number: HNAR-241
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Writing for Documentary Film

3

The art of non-fiction screenwriting is essentially the art of narrativizing real life events. You will learn how to discover stories, research archival materials, conduct interviews, and write scripts. These scripts will become the foundation to your feature film. While the class will focus on the craft of storytelling within the realm of non-fiction, you will explore experimental and stylized communication through film. During this process, you will also pitch an idea and write a treatment, articulating your vision, both visually and conceptually.

Course number: HNAR-240
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Writing for TV Animation

3

In this course, students will learn how to write scripts for animated television shows and prepare a pitch bible for an animated series. The class will discuss building compelling characters, narrative arcs, the job of a TV writer, script format and how to write dialogue that's character specific. Dani Michaeli has written for animated television shows for ten years, has worked with networks such as Nickelodeon and Disney and on a variety of series from kids shows ("SpongeBob SquarePants", "Harvey Beaks") to shows that reach an older demographic ("South Park"). Whether students become professionals in television, movies, commercials or games, they will be working with scripts and knowing how they work from the inside out will be an essential skill and an invaluable tool.

Course number: HNAR-315
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Writing for Video Games

3

Video games are unlike any other storytelling medium; their greatest strength--interactivity--poses unique challenges (and opportunities) for a writer. In this course, we will work to analyze and identify what works and what doesn't in writing for video games, and apply that knowledge to create compelling worlds and stories for a player. We will examine both the direct functions (e.g. dialogue), and the indirect functions (reflected in the pacing, design, and gameplay) of writing for the medium, with a focus on practical application of storytelling as pertains specifically to video games. At the end of the class, students will present an original video game concept and story, along with key art and an explanation of game mechanics, and discuss how it all fits together. Overall familiarity with "video games" in the collective sense is a must.

Course number: HNAR-311
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Writing the Cable Drama

The future is upon us and the future is high quality cable dramas. Shows like True Detective, The Wire, and Mad Men have ushered in what is being called the 2nd golden age of television. These shows are filled with deeply layered stories, unforgettable characters, lush art direction, and cinematic presentations that have made cable the go to destination for consumers and creators. Writing The Cable Drama prepares Art Center students to become part of this exploding field by guiding them through all the steps of creating a marketable pilot and ancillary materials for a one-hour cable drama. Students who successfully complete this course can build a series from the ground up. They can talk fluently about story structure, dramatic writing, the elements of a pilot, and produce all the necessary material to pitch and sell a one-hour cable drama. Class products include: an original one-hour drama script, series bible, format and tone book.

Course number: HNAR-314
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam

Writing, Exhibiting & Curating

Illustration and artwork exist within a context. How you frame your work---by title and description; by choosing your medium and site for exhibition and dissemination; by relating it to peers' work, historical precedents, trends or academic research---is part of its creation. In this class we develop writing as a tandem practice to your studio work to create your artist voice, relevant statements, and lay the groundwork for grant writing. Students will plan, administrate, and execute a group exhibition off-site, including a smaller thematically curated show of works from peers and artists outside of class. This three-hour seminar will include professional portfolio development, weekly writing, and weekly field trips to exhibitions, studios and curated sites (book and music stores, museums, collections, and events). Students will present and improve portfolios throughout this intensive.

Course number: HPRO-302
Prerequisite: Must have taken: HMN-100/HWRI-102 Writing Studio, or HMN-101/HWRI-101 Writing Studio Intensive, or Pass the Writing Placement Exam